tribe/m

Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Fri, April 11, 2008 - 12:42 PM by Bobs

Journey to the center of the earth: Discovery sheds light on mantle formation

Uncovering a rare, two-billion-year-old window into the Earth’s mantle, a University of Houston professor and his team have found our planet’s geological history is more complex than previously thought.

Jonathan Snow, assistant professor of geosciences at UH, led a team of researchers in a North Pole expedition, resulting in a discovery that could shed new light on the mantle, the vast layer that lies beneath the planet’s outer crust. These findings are described in a paper titled “Ancient, highly heterogeneous mantle beneath Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean,” appearing recently in Nature.

These two-billion-year-old rocks that time forgot were found along the bottom of the Arctic Ocean floor, unearthed during research voyages in 2001 and 2004 to the Gakkel Ridge, an approximately 1,000-mile-long underwater mountain range between Greenland and Siberia. This massive underwater mountain range forms the border between the North American and Eurasian plates beneath the Arctic Ocean, where the two plates diverge.

These were the first major expeditions ever undertaken to the Gakkel Ridge, and these latest published findings are the fruit of several years of research and millions of dollars spent to retrieve and analyze these rocks.

The mantle, the rock layer that comprises about 70 percent of the Earth’s mass, sits several miles below the planet’s surface. Mid-ocean ridges like Gakkel, where mantle rock is slowly pushing upward to form new volcanic crust as the tectonic plates slowly move apart, is one place geologists look for clues about the mantle. Gakkel Ridge is unique because it features – at some locations – the least volcanic activity and most mantle exposure ever discovered on a mid-ocean ridge, allowing Snow and his colleagues to recover many mantle samples.

“I just about fell off my chair,” Snow said. “We can’t exaggerate how important these rocks are – they’re a window into that deep part of the Earth.”

Venturing out aboard a 400-foot-long research icebreaker, Snow and his team sifted through thousands of pounds of rocks scooped up from the ocean floor by the ship’s dredging device. The samples were labeled and cataloged and then cut into slices thinner than a human hair to be examined under a microscope. That is when Snow realized he found something that, for many geologists, is as rare and fascinating as moon rocks – mantle rocks devoid of sea floor alteration. Analysis of the isotopes of osmium, a noble metal rarer than platinum within the mantle rocks, indicated they were two billion years old. The use of osmium isotopes underscores the significance of the results, because using them for this type of analysis is still a new, innovative and difficult technique.

Since the mantle is slowly moving and churning within the Earth, geologists believe the mantle is a layer of well-mixed rock. Fresh mantle rock wells up at mid-ocean ridges to create new crust. As the tectonic plates move, this crust slowly makes its way to a subduction zone, a plate boundary where one plate slides underneath another and the crust is pushed back into the mantle from which it came.

Because this process takes about 200 million years, it was surprising to find rocks that had not been remixed inside the mantle for two billion years. The discovery of the rocks suggests the mantle is not as well-mixed or homogenous as geologists previously believed, revealing that the Earth’s mantle preserves an older and more complex geologic history than previously thought. This opens the possibility of exploring early events on Earth through the study of ancient rocks preserved within the Earth’s mantle.

The rocks were found during two expeditions Snow and his team made to the Arctic, each lasting about two months. The voyages were undertaken while Snow was a research scientist at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, and the laboratory study was done by his research team that now stretches from Hawaii to Houston to Beijing.

Since coming to UH in 2005, Snow’s work stemming from the Gakkel Ridge samples has continued, with more research needed to determine exactly why these rocks remained unmixed for so long. Further study using a laser microprobe technique for osmium analysis available only in Australia is planned for next year.

Source: University of Houston


www.physorg.com/news127124384.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Sun, April 13, 2008 - 2:13 PM by Bobs

Geologists Discover New Way of Estimating Size and Frequency of Meteorite Impacts

Scientists have developed a new way of determining the size and frequency of meteorites that have collided with Earth.

Their work shows that the size of the meteorite that likely plummeted to Earth at the time of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary 65 million years ago was four to six kilometers in diameter. The meteorite was the trigger, scientists believe, for the mass extinction of dinosaurs and other life forms.

François Paquay, a geologist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), used variations (isotopes) of the rare element osmium in sediments at the ocean bottom to estimate the size of these meteorites. The results are published in this week's issue of the journal Science.

When meteorites collide with Earth, they carry a different osmium isotope ratio than the levels normally seen throughout the oceans.

"The vaporization of meteorites carries a pulse of this rare element into the area where they landed," says Rodey Batiza of the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Division of Ocean Sciences, which funded the research along with NSF's Division of Earth Sciences. "The osmium mixes throughout the ocean quickly. Records of these impact-induced changes in ocean chemistry are then preserved in deep-sea sediments."

Paquay analyzed samples from two sites, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 1219 (located in the Equatorial Pacific), and ODP site 1090 (located off of the tip of South Africa) and measured osmium isotope levels during the late Eocene period, a time during which large meteorite impacts are known to have occurred.

"The record in marine sediments allowed us to discover how osmium changes in the ocean during and after an impact," says Paquay.

The scientists expect that this new approach to estimating impact size will become an important complement to a more well-known method based on iridium.

Paquay, along with co-author Gregory Ravizza of UHM and collaborators Tarun Dalai from the Indian Institute of Technology and Bernhard Peucker-Ehrenbrink from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, also used this method to make estimates of impact size at the K-T boundary.

Even though these method works well for the K-T impact, it would break down for an event larger than that: the meteorite contribution of osmium to the oceans would overwhelm existing levels of the element, researchers believe, making it impossible to sort out the osmium's origin.

Under the assumption that all the osmium carried by meteorites is dissolved in seawater, the geologists were able to use their method to estimate the size of the K-T meteorite as four to six kilometers in diameter.

The potential for recognizing previously unknown impacts is an important outcome of this research, the scientists say.

"We know there were two big impacts, and can now give an interpretation of how the oceans behaved during these impacts," says Paquay. "Now we can look at other impact events, both large and small."

Source: National Science Foundation



www.physorg.com/news127195405.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Mon, April 28, 2008 - 12:14 AM by Unsubsc...

ScienceDaily (Apr. 26, 2008) — Geologists studying deposits of volcanic glass in the western United States have found that the central Sierra Nevada largely attained its present elevation 12 million years ago, roughly 8 or 9 million years earlier than commonly thought.
The finding has implications not only for understanding the geologic history of the mountain range but for modeling ancient global climates."All the global climate models that are currently being used strongly rely on knowing the topography of the Earth," said Andreas Mulch, who was a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford when he conducted the research. He is the lead author of a paper published recently in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
A variety of studies over the last five years have shown that the presence of the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains in the western United States has direct implications for climate patterns extending into Europe, Mulch said."If we did not have these mountains, we would completely change the climate on the North American continent, and even change mean annual temperatures in central Europe," he said. "That's why we need to have some idea of how mountains were distributed over planet Earth in order to run past climate models reliably." Mulch is now a professor of tectonics and climate at the University of Hannover in Germany.
Mulch and his colleagues, including Page Chamberlain, a Stanford professor of environmental earth system science, reached their conclusion about the timing of the uplift of the Sierra Nevada by analyzing hydrogen isotopes in water incorporated into volcanic glass.
Because so much of the airborne moisture falls as rain on the windward side of the mountains, land on the leeward side gets far less rain—an effect called a "rain shadow"—which often produces a desert.

The higher the mountain, the more pronounced the rain shadow effect is and the greater the decrease in the number of heavy hydrogen isotopes in the water that makes it across the mountains and falls on the leeward side of the range. By determining the ratio of heavier to lighter hydrogen isotopes preserved in volcanic glass and comparing it with today's topography and rainwater, researchers can estimate the elevation of the mountains at the time the ancient water crossed them.
Volcanic glass is an excellent material for preserving ancient rainfall. The glass forms during explosive eruptions, when tiny particles of molten rock are ejected into the air. "These glasses were little melt particles, and they cooled so rapidly when they were blown into the atmosphere that they just froze, basically," Mulch said. "They couldn't crystallize and form minerals."
Because glass has an amorphous structure, as opposed to the ordered crystalline structure of minerals, there are structural vacancies in the glass into which water can diffuse. Once the glass has been deposited on the surface of the Earth, rainwater, runoff and near-surface groundwater are all available to interact with it. Mulch said the diffusion process continues until the glass is effectively saturated with water.
The samples they studied ranged from slightly more than 12 million years old to as young as 600,000 years old, a time span when volcanism was rampant in the western United States owing to the ongoing subduction of the Pacific plate under the continental crust of the North American plate.
Until now, researchers have been guided largely by "very good geophysical evidence" indicating that the range reached its present elevation approximately 3 or 4 million years ago, owing to major changes in the subsurface structure of the mountains, Mulch said.

"There was a very dense root of the Sierra Nevada, rock material that became so dense that it actually detached and sank down into the Earth's mantle, just because of density differences," Mulch said. "If you remove a very heavy weight at the base of something, the surface will rebound."

The rebound of the range after losing such a massive amount of material should have been substantial. But, Mulch said, "We do not observe any change in the surface elevation of the Sierra Nevada at that time, and that's what we were trying to test in this model."

However, Mulch said he does not think his results refute the geophysical evidence. It could be that the Sierra Nevada did not evolve uniformly along its 400-mile length, he said. The geophysical data indicating the loss of the crustal root is from the southern Sierra Nevada; Mulch's study focused more on the northern and central part of the range. In the southern Sierra Nevada, the weather patterns are different, and the rain shadow effect that Mulch's approach hinges on is less pronounced.

"That's why it's important to have information that's coming from deeper parts of the Earth's crust and from the surface and try to correlate these two," Mulch said. To really understand periods in the Earth's past where climate conditions were markedly different from today, he said, "you need to have integrated studies."

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation.
Adapted from materials provided by Stanford University
adendum : This article was reproduced in part, the full text can be accessed at www.sciencedaily.com/ h


This posting was deleted by Bobs


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Wed, April 30, 2008 - 2:15 PM by Bobs

Rocks under the northern ocean are found to resemble ones far south

Scientists probing volcanic rocks from deep under the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean have discovered a special geochemical signature until now found only in the southern hemisphere. The rocks were dredged from the remote Gakkel Ridge, which lies under 3,000 to 5,000 meters of water; it is Earth’s most northerly undersea spreading ridge. The study appears in the May 1 issue of the leading science journal Nature.

The Gakkel extends some 1,800 kilometers beneath the Arctic ice between Greenland and Siberia. Heavy ice cover prevented scientists from getting at it until the 2001 Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition, in which U.S and German ice breakers cooperated. This produced data showing that the ridge is divided into robust eastern and western volcanic zones, separated by an anomalously deep segment. That abrupt boundary contains exposed unmelted rock from earth’s mantle, the layer that underlies the planet’s hardened outer shell, or lithosphere.

By studying chemical trace elements and isotope ratios of the elements lead, neodymium, and strontium, the paper’s authors showed that the eastern lavas, closer to Siberia, display a typical northern hemisphere makeup. However, the western lavas, closer to Greenland, show an isotopic signature called the Dupal anomaly. The Dupal anomaly, whose origin is intensely debated, is found in the southern Indian and Atlantic oceans, but until now was not known from spreading ridges of the northern hemisphere. Lead author Steven Goldstein, a geochemist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), said that this did not suggest the rocks came from the south. Rather, he said, they might have formed in similar ways. “It implies that the processes at work in the Indian Ocean might have an analog here,” said Goldstein. Possible origins debated in the south include upwelling of material from the deep earth near the core, or shallow contamination of southern hemispheric mantle with certain elements during subduction along the edges of the ancient supercontinent of Pangea.

At least in the Arctic, the scientists say they know what happened. Some 53 million years ago, what are now Eurasia and Greenland began separating, with the Gakkel as the spreading axis. Part of Eurasia’s “keel”—a relatively stable layer of mantle pasted under the rigid continent and enriched in certain elements that are also enriched in the continental crust—got peeled away. As the spreading continued, the keel material got mixed with “normal” mantle that was depleted in these same elements. This formed a mixture resembling the Dupal anomaly. The proof, said Goldstein, is that the chemistry of the western Gakkel lavas appear to be mixtures of “normal” mantle and lavas coming from volcanoes on the Norwegian/Russian island of Spitsbergen. Although Spitsbergen is an island, it is attached to the Eurasian continent, and its volcanoes are fueled by melted keel material.

“This is unlikely to put an end to the debate about the origin of the southern hemisphere Dupal signature, as there may be other viable explanations for it,” said Goldstein. “On the other hand, this study nails it in the Arctic. Moreover, it delineates an important process within Earth’s system, where material associated with the continental lithospheric keel is transported to the deeper convectiing mantle.”

Source: The Earth Institute at Columbia University



www.physorg.com/news128778940.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Wed, April 30, 2008 - 2:18 PM by Bobs

How deep is Europe?

The Earth's crust is, on global average around 40 kilometres deep. In relation to the total diameter of the Earth with approx. 12800 kilometres this appears to be rather shallow, but precisely these upper kilometres of the crust, the human habitat, is of special interest for us.

Europe's crust shows an astonishing diversity: for example the crust under Finland is as deep as one only expects for crust under a mountain range such as the Alps. It is also amazing that the crust under Iceland and the Faroer-Islands is considerably deeper than a typical oceanic crust. This is explained by M. Tesauro und M. Kaban from GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ) and S. Cloetingh from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam in a recent publication in the renowned scientific journal "Geophysical Research Letters". GFZ is the German Research Centre for Geosciences and a member of the Helmholtz Association.

For many years intensive investigation of the Earth's crust has been underway. However, different research groups in Europe have mostly been concentrating on individual regions. Hence, a high-resolution and consistent overall picture has not been available to date. With the present study this gap can now be filled. By incorporating the latest seismological results a digital model of the European crust has been created. This new detailed picture also allows for the minimization of interfering effects of the crust when taking a glance at the deeper Earth's interior.

A detailed model of the Earth's crust, i.e. from the upper layers to approx. a depth of 60 km is essential to understand the many millions of years of development of the European Continent. This knowledge supports the discovery of the commercial importance of ore deposits or crude oil in the continental shelf or in general with the use of the subterranean e.g. for the sequestration of CO2. It also contributes to the identification of geological hazards such as earthquakes.

Citation: Tesauro, M., M. K. Kaban, and S. A. P. L. Cloetingh (2008), EuCRUST-07: A new reference model for the European crust, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L05313, doi:10.1029/2007GL032244.

Source: Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres


www.physorg.com/news128774944.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Sun, May 4, 2008 - 2:27 AM by Unsubsc...

by Barry Ray
Tallahassee FL (SPX) May 02, 2008
Working with colleagues from NASA, a Florida State University researcher has published a paper that calls into question three decades of conventional wisdom regarding some of the physical processes that helped shape the Earth as we know it today.
Munir Humayun, an associate professor in FSU's Department of Geological Sciences and a researcher at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, co-authored a paper, "Partitioning of Palladium at High Pressures and Temperatures During Core Formation," that was recently published in the peer-reviewed science journal Nature Geoscience.

The paper provides a direct challenge to the popular "late veneer hypothesis," a theory which suggests that all of our water, as well as several so-called "iron-loving" elements, were added to the Earth late in its formation by impacts with icy comets, meteorites and other passing objects.

"For 30 years, the late-veneer hypothesis has been the dominant paradigm for understanding Earth's early history, and our ultimate origins," Humayun said. "Now, with our latest research, we're suggesting that the late-veneer hypothesis may not be the only way of explaining the presence of certain elements in the Earth's crust and mantle."

To illustrate his point, Humayun points to what is known about the Earth's composition.

"We know that the Earth has an iron-rich core that accounts for about one-third of its total mass," he said. "Surrounding this core is a rocky mantle that accounts for most of the remaining two-thirds," with the thin crust of the Earth's surface making up the rest.

"According to the late-veneer hypothesis, most of the original iron-loving, or siderophile, elements" -- those elements such as gold, platinum, palladium and iridium that bond most readily with iron -- "would have been drawn down to the core over tens of millions of years and thereby removed from the Earth's crust and mantle. The amounts of siderophile elements that we see today, then, would have been supplied after the core was formed by later meteorite bombardment. This bombardment also would have brought in water, carbon and other materials essential for life, the oceans and the atmosphere."

To test the hypothesis, Humayun and his NASA colleagues -- Kevin Righter and Lisa Danielson -- conducted experiments at Johnson Space Center in Houston and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee. At the Johnson Space Center, Righter and Danielson used a massive 880-ton press to expose samples of rock containing palladium -- a metal commonly used in catalytic converters -- to extremes of heat and temperature equal to those found more than 300 miles inside the Earth.

The samples were then brought to the magnet lab, where Humayun used a highly sensitive analytical tool known as an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, or ICP-MS, to measure the distribution of palladium within the sample.

"At the highest pressures and temperatures, our experiments found palladium in the same relative proportions between rock and metal as is observed in the natural world," Humayun said. "Put another way, the distribution of palladium and other siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle can be explained by means other than millions of years of meteorite bombardment."

The potential ramifications of his team's research are significant, Humayun said.

"This work will have important consequences for geologists' thinking about core formation, the core's present relation to the mantle, and the bombardment history of the early Earth," he said. "It also could lead us to rethink the origins of life on our planet."

www.terradaily.com/reports/


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Fri, June 13, 2008 - 12:11 PM by Bobs

Ancient mineral shows early Earth climate tough on continents

A new analysis of ancient minerals called zircons suggests that a harsh climate may have scoured and possibly even destroyed the surface of the Earth's earliest continents.

Zircons, the oldest known materials on Earth, offer a window in time back as far as 4.4 billion years ago, when the planet was a mere 150 million years old. Because these crystals are exceptionally resistant to chemical changes, they have become the gold standard for determining the age of ancient rocks, says UW-Madison geologist John Valley.

Valley previously used these tiny mineral grains — smaller than a speck of sand — to show that rocky continents and liquid water formed on the Earth much earlier than previously thought, about 4.2 billion years ago.

In a new paper published online this week in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, a team of scientists led by UW-Madison geologists Takayuki Ushikubo, Valley and Noriko Kita show that rocky continents and liquid water existed at least 4.3 billion years ago and were subjected to heavy weathering by an acrid climate.

Ushikubo, the first author on the new study, says that atmospheric weathering could provide an answer to a long-standing question in geology: why no rock samples have ever been found dating back to the first 500 million years after the Earth formed.

"Currently, no rocks remain from before about 4 billion years ago," he says. "Some people consider this as evidence for very high temperature conditions on the ancient Earth."

Previous explanations for the missing rocks have included destruction by barrages of meteorites and the possibility that the early Earth was a red-hot sea of magma in which rocks could not form.

The current analysis suggests a different scenario. Ushikubo and colleagues used a sophisticated new instrument called an ion microprobe to analyze isotope ratios of the element lithium in zircons from the Jack Hills in western Australia. By comparing these chemical fingerprints to lithium compositions in zircons from continental crust and primitive rocks similar to the Earth's mantle, they found evidence that the young planet already had the beginnings of continents, relatively cool temperatures and liquid water by the time the Australian zircons formed.

"At 4.3 billion years ago, the Earth already had habitable conditions," Ushikubo says.

The zircons' lithium signatures also hold signs of rock exposure on the Earth's surface and breakdown by weather and water, identified by low levels of a heavy lithium isotope. "Weathering can occur at the surface on continental crust or at the bottom of the ocean, but the [observed] lithium compositions can only be formed from continental crust," says Ushikubo.

The findings suggest that extensive weathering may have destroyed the Earth's earliest rocks, he says.

"Extensive weathering earlier than 4 billion years ago actually makes a lot of sense," says Valley. "People have suspected this, but there's never been any direct evidence."

Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can combine with water to form carbonic acid, which falls as acid rain. The early Earth's atmosphere is believed to have contained extremely high levels of carbon dioxide — maybe 10,000 times as much as today.

"At [those levels], you would have had vicious acid rain and intense greenhouse [effects]. That is a condition that will dissolve rocks," Valley says. "If granites were on the surface of the Earth, they would have been destroyed almost immediately — geologically speaking — and the only remnants that we could recognize as ancient would be these zircons."

Source: UW-Madison



www.physorg.com/news132583481.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Wed, July 16, 2008 - 4:35 AM by offlinerob

by David Tenenbaum
for Astrobiology Magazine
Moffett Field (SPX) Jul 15, 2008
The oldest rocks so far identified on Earth are one-half billion years younger than the planet itself, so geologists have relied on certain crystals as micro-messengers from ancient times. Called zircons (for their major constituent, zirconium) these crystals "are the kind of mineral that a geologist loves," says Stephen Mojzsis, an associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
"They capture chemical information about the melt from which they crystallize, and they preserve that information very, very well," even under extreme heat and pressure.

The most ancient zircons yet recovered date back 4.38 billion years. They provide the first direct data on the young Earth soon after the solar system coalesced from a disk of gas and dust 4.57 billion years ago. These zircons tend to refute the conventional picture of a hot, volcanic planet under constant assault by asteroids and comets.

One modern use for the ancient zircons, Mojzsis says, is to explore the late heavy bombardment, a cataclysmic, 30- to 100-million-year period of impacts that many scientists think could have extinguished any life that may have been around 4 billion years ago.

With support from a NASA Exobiology grant, Mojzsis has begun examining the effect of impacts on a new batch of zircons found in areas that have been hit by more recent impacts. Some will come from the Sudbury, Ontario impact zone, which was formed 1.8 billion years ago.

"We know the size, velocity and temperature distribution, so we will be looking at the outer shell of the zircons," which can form during the intense heat and pressure of an impact, he says. A second set of zircons was chosen to span the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) impact of 65 million years ago, which exterminated the dinosaurs.

"The point is to demonstrate that the Hadean zircons show the same type of impact features as these younger ones," Mojzsis says. The Hadean Era, named for the hellish conditions that supposedly prevailed on Earth, ended about 3.8 billion years ago.

The oldest zircons indicate that Earth already had oceans and arcs of islands 4.45 to 4.5 billion years ago, just 50 million years after the gigantic collision that formed the moon. At that time, Mojzsis says, "Earth had more similarities than differences with today. It was completely contrary to the old assumption, based on no data, that Earth's surface was a blasted, lunar-like landscape."

Zircons are natural timekeepers because, during crystallization, they incorporate radioactive uranium and thorium, but exclude lead. As the uranium and thorium decay, they produce lead isotopes that get trapped within the zircons.

By knowing the half-lives of the decay of uranium and thorium to lead, and the amount of these elements and their isotopes in the mineral, it's possible to calculate how much time has elapsed since the zircon crystallized.

Zircons carry other information as well. Those that contain a high concentration of the heavier oxygen isotope O-18, compared to the more common O-16, crystallized in magma containing material that had interacted with liquid water.

A new "titanium thermometer," developed by Bruce Watson of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Mark Harrison of the University of California at Los Angeles, can determine the temperature of crystallization based on the titanium concentration.

Both these analyses showed that zircons from as far back as 4.38 billion years ago crystallized in relatively cool conditions, such as at subduction zones where water and magma interact at the intersection of tectonic plates.

To Mojzsis, the message from the most ancient zircons is this: just 50 million years after a mammoth impact formed the moon, Earth had conditions we might recognize today, not the hellish conditions long favored by the conventional viewpoint.

For reasons related to the orbital dynamics of the solar system, that bucolic era was brutally interrupted about 3.96 billion years ago by the "late heavy bombardment," a period of intense asteroid impacts that churned the planet's surface.

The zircons record this period in the form of a narrow, 2-micron-thick zone that most likely formed during a brief exposure to very high temperature. Careful radioactive dating shows that these zones formed essentially simultaneously, even in Hadean zircons of different ages, Mojzsis says. "We found the most amazing thing. These zircons, even if the core ages are different, all share a common 3.96 billion year age for this overgrowth."

The zones also record "massive loss of lead, which happens when the system is heated quite catastrophically and then quenched," Mojzsis adds.

"So it looks like these zircons were sort of cauterized by some process" that both built up the zone and allowed the lead to escape. The cause, he says, was likely "some extremely energetic event" at 3.96 billion years ago, a date that "correlates very nicely to other estimates of the beginning of the late heavy bombardment."

The intense impacts of this period would seem to have exterminated any life that had formed previously. And yet Mojzsis says this conclusion may be overturned by the zircon data.

"From the Hadean zircons we can understand further what the thermal consequences for the crust were, and test our models for habitability during the late heavy bombardment. Most people think it sterilized Earth's surface, but our analysis says that is not the case at all. For a microbial biosphere at some depth in crustal rocks and sediments, impact at the surface zone did not matter," he says.

Indeed, University of Colorado post-doctoral student Oleg Abramov has calculated that the habitable volume of Earth's crust actually increased by a factor 10 for heat-loving thermophiles and hyperthermophiles during the impacts, Mojzsis says.

This raises the possibility that life survived the period of heavy impacts. "The bombing, however locally devastating, creates quite an ample supply of hydrothermal altered rock and hydrothermal systems, worldwide," says Mojzsis.

Although that's bad for organisms that require cool conditions, "thermophiles do not even notice," he says.

"This goes back to an old idea, maybe the late heavy bombardment pruned the tree of life, and selected for thermophiles. Whatever the diversity of life was like before the late heavy bombardment, afterwards it was diminished, and all life henceforth is derived from these survivors."
www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Tue, July 29, 2008 - 3:33 PM by offlinerob

Columbus OH (SPX) Jul 29, 2008
A single typhoon in Taiwan buries as much carbon in the ocean -- in the form of sediment -- as all the other rains in that country all year long combined.
That's the finding of an Ohio State University study published in a recent issue of the journal Geology.

The study -- the first ever to examine the chemistry of stream water and sediments that were being washed out to sea while a typhoon was happening at full force -- will help scientists develop better models of global climate change.

Anne Carey, associate professor of earth sciences at Ohio State, said that she and her colleagues have braved two typhoons since starting the project in 2004. The Geology paper details their findings from a study of Taiwan's Choshui River during Typhoon Mindulle in July of that year.

Carey's team analyzes water and river sediments from around the world in order to measure how much carbon is pulled from the atmosphere as mountains weather away.

They study two types of weathering: physical and chemical. Physical weathering happens when organic matter containing carbon adheres to soil that is washed into the ocean and buried.

Chemical weathering happens when silicate rock on the mountainside is exposed to carbon dioxide and water, and the rock disintegrates. The carbon washes out to sea, where it eventually forms calcium carbonate and gets deposited on the ocean floor.

If the carbon gets buried in the ocean, Carey explained, it eventually becomes part of sedimentary rock, and doesn't return to the atmosphere for hundreds of millions of years.

Though the carbon buried in the ocean by storms won't solve global warming, knowing how much carbon is buried offshore of mountainous islands such as Taiwan could help scientists make better estimates of how much carbon is in the atmosphere -- and help them decipher its effect on global climate change.

Scientists have long suspected that extreme storms such as hurricanes and typhoons bury a lot of carbon, because they wash away so much sediment. But since the sediment washes out to sea quickly, samples had to be captured during a storm to answer the question definitively.

"We discovered that if you miss sampling these storms, then you miss truly understanding the sediment and chemical delivery of these rivers," said study coauthor and Ohio State doctoral student Steve Goldsmith.

The researchers found that, of the 61 million tons of sediment carried out to sea by the Choshui River during Typhoon Mindulle, some 500,000 tons consisted of particles of carbon created during chemical weathering. That's about 95 percent as much carbon as the river transports during normal rains over an entire year, and it equates to more than 400 tons of carbon being washed away for each square mile of the watershed during the storm.

Carey's collaborators from Academia Sinica -- a major research institute in Taiwan -- happened to be out collecting sediments for a long-term study of the region when Mindulle erupted in the Pacific.

"I don't want to say that a typhoon is serendipity, but you take what the weather provides," Carey said. "Since Taiwan has an average of four typhoons a year, in summer you pretty much can't avoid them. It's not unusual for some of us to be out in the field when one hits."

As the storm neared the coast, the geologists drove to the Choshui River watershed near the central western portion of the country.

Normally, the river is very shallow. But during a typhoon, it swells with water from the mountains. It's not unusual to see boulders the size of cars -- or actual cars -- floating downstream.

Mindulle gave the geologists their first chance to test some new equipment they designed for capturing water samples from storm runoff.

The equipment consisted of one-liter plastic bottles wedged inside a weighted Teflon case that would sink beneath the waves during a storm. They suspended the contraption from bridges above the river as the waters raged below. At the height of the storm, they tied themselves to the bridges for safety.

They did this once every three hours, taking refuge in a nearby storm shelter in between.

Four days later, after the storm had passed, they filtered the water from the bottles and analyzed the sediments for particulate organic carbon. Then they measured the amount of silica in the remaining water sample in order to calculate the amount of weathering occurring with the storm.

Because they know that two carbon molecules are required to weather one molecule of silica, they could then calculate how much carbon washed out to sea. Carey and Goldsmith did those calculations with study coauthor Berry Lyons, professor of earth sciences at Ohio State.

Carey cautioned that this is the first study of its kind, and more data are needed to put the Mindulle numbers into a long-term perspective. She and Goldsmith are still analyzing the data from Typhoon Haitang, which struck when the two of them happened to be in Taiwan in 2005, so it's too early to say how much carbon runoff occurred during that storm.

"But with two to four typhoons happening in Taiwan per year, it's not unreasonable to think that the amount of carbon sequestered during these storms could be comparable to the long-term annual carbon flux for the country," she said.

The findings could be useful to scientists who model global climate change, Goldsmith said. He pointed to other studies that suggest that mountainous islands such as Taiwan, New Zealand, and Papua New Guinea produce one third of all the sediments that enter the world oceans annually.

As scientists calculate Earth's carbon "budget" -- how much carbon is being added to the atmosphere and how much is being taken away -- they need to know how much is being buried in the oceans.

"What is the true budget of carbon being sequestered in the ocean per year? If the majority of sediment and dissolved constituents are being delivered during these storms, and the storms aren't taken into account, those numbers are going to be off," Goldsmith said.

As weathering pulls carbon from the atmosphere, the planet cools. For instance, other Ohio State geologists recently determined that the rise and weathering of the Appalachians preceded an ice age 450 million years ago.

If more carbon is being buried in the ocean than scientists once thought, does that mean we can worry less about global warming?

"I wouldn't go that far," Goldsmith said. "But if you want to build an accurate climate model, you need to understand how much CO2 is taken out naturally every year. And this paper shows that those numbers could be off substantially."

Carey agreed, and added that weathering rocks is not a practical strategy for reversing global warming, either.

"You'd have to weather all the volcanic rocks in the world to reduce the CO2 level back to pre-industrial times," she said. "You'd have to grind the rock into really fine particles, and you'd consume a lot of energy -- fossil fuels -- to do that, so there probably wouldn't be any long-term gain."


www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Tue, August 12, 2008 - 3:04 PM by Bobs

X-rays use diamonds as a window to the center of the Earth


Diamonds from Brazil have provided the answers to a question that Earth scientists have been trying to understand for many years: how is oceanic crust that has been subducted deep into the Earth recycled back into volcanic rocks?

A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, working alongside colleagues at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory, have gained a deeper insight into how the Earth recycles itself in the deep earth tectonic cycle way beyond the depths that can be accessed by drilling. The full paper on this research has been published (31 July) in the scientific journal, Nature.

The Earth's oceanic crust is constantly renewed in a cycle which has been occurring for billions of years. This crust is constantly being renewed from below by magma from the Earth's mantle that has been forced up at mid-ocean ridges. This crust is eventually returned to the mantle, sinking down at subduction zones that extend deep beneath the continents. Seismic imaging suggests that the oceanic crust can be subducted to depths of almost 3000km below the Earth's surface where it can remain for billions of years, during which time the crust material develops its own unique 'flavour' in comparison with the surrounding magmas. Exactly how this happens is a question that has baffled Earth scientists for years.

The Earth's oceanic crust lies under seawater for millions of years, and over time reacts with the seawater to form carbonate minerals, such as limestone, When subducted, these carbonate minerals have the effect of lowering the melting point of the crust material compared to that of the surrounding magma. It is thought that this melt is loaded with elements that carry the crustal 'flavour'.

This team of researchers have now proven this theory by looking at diamonds from the Juina area of Brazil. As the carbonate-rich magma rises through the mantle, diamonds crystallise, trapping minute quantities of minerals in the process. They form at great depths and pressures and therefore can provide clues as to what is happening at the Earth's deep interior, down to several hundred kilometres - way beyond the depths that can be physically accessed by drilling. Diamonds from the Juina area are particularly renowned for these mineral inclusions.

At the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory, the team used an intense beam of x-rays to look at the conditions of formation for the mineral perovskite which occurs in these diamonds but does not occur naturally near the Earth's surface. With a focused synchrotron X-ray beam less than half the width of a human hair, they used X-ray diffraction techniques to establish the conditions at which perovskite is stable, concluding that these mineral inclusions were formed up to 700km into the Earth in the mantle transition zone.

These results, backed up by further experiments carried out at the University of Edinburgh, the University of Bayreuth in Germany, and the Advanced Light Source in the USA, enabled the research team to show that the diamonds and their perovskite inclusions had indeed crystallised from very small-degree melts in the Earth's mantle. Upon heating, oceanic crust forms carbonatite melts, super-concentrated in trace elements with the 'flavour' of the Earth's oceanic crust. Furthermore, such melts may be widespread throughout the mantle and may have been 'flavouring' the mantle rocks for a very long time.

Dr Alistair Lennie, a research scientist at STFC Daresbury Laboratory, said: "Using X-rays to find solutions to Earth science questions is an area that has been highly active on the SRS at Daresbury Laboratory for some time. We are very excited that the SRS has contributed to answering such long standing questions about the Earth in this way."

Dr. Michael Walter, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, said: "The resources available at Daresbury's SRS for high-pressure research have been crucial in helping us determine the origin of these diamonds and their inclusions."

Source: Science and Technology Facilities Council



www.physorg.com/news137767686.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Tue, August 26, 2008 - 5:23 AM by offlinerob

Moffett Field CA (SPX) Aug 25, 2008
For the last few years, astronomers have faced a puzzle: The vast majority of asteroids that come near the Earth are of a type that matches only a tiny fraction of the meteorites that most frequently hit our planet. Since meteorites are mostly pieces of asteroids, this discrepancy was hard to explain, but a team from MIT and other institutions has now found what it believes is the answer to the puzzle.
The smaller rocks that most often fall to Earth, it seems, come straight in from the main asteroid belt out between Mars and Jupiter, rather than from the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population.

The puzzle gradually emerged from a long-term study of the properties of asteroids carried out by MIT professor of planetary science Richard Binzel and his students, along with postdoctoral researcher P. Vernazza, who is now with the European Space Agency, and A.T. Tokunaga, director of the University of Hawaii's Institute of Astronomy.

By studying the spectral signatures of near-Earth asteroids, they were able to compare them with spectra obtained on Earth from the thousands of meteorites that have been recovered from falls. But the more they looked, the more they found that most NEAs -- about two-thirds of them -- match a specific type of meteorites called LL chondrites, which only represent about 8 percent of meteorites. How could that be?

"Why do we see a difference between the objects hitting the ground and the big objects whizzing by?" Binzel asks. "It's been a head-scratcher." As the effect became gradually more and more noticeable as more asteroids were analyzed, "we finally had a big enough data set that the statistics demanded an answer. It could no longer be just a coincidence."

Way out in the main belt, the population is much more varied, and approximates the mix of types that is found among meteorites. But why would the things that most frequently hit us match this distant population better than it matches the stuff that's right in our neighborhood? That's where the idea emerged of a fast track all the way from the main belt to a "splat!" on Earth's surface.

This fast track, it turns out, is caused by an obscure effect that was discovered long ago, but only recently recognized as a significant factor in moving asteroids around, called the Yarkovsky effect.

The Yarkovsky effect causes asteroids to change their orbits as a result of the way they absorb the sun's heat on one side and radiate it back later as they rotate around. This causes a slight imbalance that slowly, over time, alters the object's path. But the key thing is this: The effect acts much more strongly on the smallest objects, and only weakly on the larger ones.

"We think the Yarkovsky effect is so efficient for meter-size objects that it can operate on all regions of the asteroid belt," not just its inner edge, Binzel says.

Thus, for chunks of rock from boulder-size on down -- the kinds of things that end up as typical meteorites -- the Yarkovsky effect plays a major role, moving them with ease from throughout the asteroid belt on to paths that can head toward Earth. For larger asteroids a kilometer or so across, the kind that we worry about as potential threats to the Earth, the effect is so weak it can only move them small amounts.

Binzel's study concludes that the largest near-Earth asteroids mostly come from the asteroid belt's innermost edge, where they are part of a specific "family" thought to all be remnants of a larger asteroid that was broken apart by collisions.

With an initial nudge from the Yarkovsky effect, kilometer-sized asteroids from the Flora region can find themselves "over the edge" of the asteroid belt and sent on a path to Earth's vicinity through the perturbing effects of the planets called resonances.

The new study is also good news for protecting the planet. One of the biggest problems in figuring out how to deal with an approaching asteroid, if and when one is discovered on a potential collision course, is that they are so varied. The best way of dealing with one kind might not work on another.

But now that this analysis has shown that the majority of near-Earth asteroids are of this specific type -- stony objects, rich in the mineral olivine and poor in iron -- it's possible to concentrate most planning on dealing with that kind of object, Binzel says.

"Odds are, an object we might have to deal with would be like an LL chondrite, and thanks to our samples in the laboratory, we can measure its properties in detail," he says. "It's the first step toward 'know thy enemy'."

The study not only yields information about impactors that might arrive at Earth in the future, but also provides new information about the types of materials delivered to Earth from extraterrestrial sources. Many scientists believe that impacts could have delivered important materials for the origin of life on early Earth.

The research is reported in the journal Nature. In addition to Binzel, Vernazza and Tokunaga, the co-authors are MIT graduate students Christina Thomas and Francesca DeMeo, S.J. Bus of the University of Hawaii, and A.S. Rivkin of Johns Hopkins University. The work was supported by NASA and the NSF.

www.spacedaily.com/reports


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Sun, September 28, 2008 - 12:30 PM by Bobs

Team finds Earth's 'oldest rocks'
By James Morgan
Science reporter, BBC News


Earth's most ancient rocks, with an age of 4.28 billion years, have been found on the shore of Hudson Bay, Canada.

Writing in Science journal, a team reports finding that a sample of Nuvvuagittuq greenstone is 250 million years older than any rocks known.

It may even hold evidence of activity by ancient life forms.

If so, it would be the earliest evidence of life on Earth - but co-author Don Francis cautioned that this had not been established.

"The rocks contain a very special chemical signature - one that can only be found in rocks which are very, very old," he said.

The professor of geology, who is based at McGill University in Montreal, added: "Nobody has found that signal any place else on the Earth."

"Originally, we thought the rocks were maybe 3.8 billion years old.

"Now we have pushed the Earth's crust back by hundreds of millions of years. That's why everyone is so excited."

Ancient rocks act as a time capsule - offering chemical clues to help geologists solve longstanding riddles of how the Earth formed and how life arose on it.

But the majority of our planet's early crust has already been mashed and recycled into Earth's interior several times over by plate tectonics.

Before this study, the oldest whole rocks were from a 4.03 billion-year-old body known as the Acasta Gneiss, in Canada's Northwest Territories.

The only things known to be older are mineral grains called zircons from Western Australia, which date back 4.36 billion years.

Date range

Professor Francis was looking for clues to the nature of the Earth's mantle 3.8 billion years ago.

He and colleague Jonathan O'Neil, from McGill University, travelled to remote tundra on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, in northern Quebec, to examine an outcrop of the Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt.

They sent samples for chemical analysis to scientists at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, who dated the rocks by measuring isotopes of the rare earth elements neodymium and samarium, which decay over time at a known rate.

The oldest rocks, termed "faux amphibolite", were dated within the range from 3.8 to 4.28 billion years old.

"4.28 billion is the figure I favour," says Francis.

"It could be that the rock was formed 4.3 billion years ago, but then it was re-worked into another rock form 3.8bn years ago. That's a hard distinction to draw."

The same unit of rock contains geological structures which might only have been formed if early life forms were present on the planet, Professor Francis suggested.

Early habitat?

The material displays a banded iron formation - fine ribbon-like bands of alternating magnetite and quartz.

This feature is typical of rock precipitated in deep sea hydrothermal vents - which have been touted as potential habitats for early life on Earth.

"These ribbons could imply that 4.3 billion years ago, Earth had an ocean, with hydrothermal circulation," said Francis.

"Now, some people believe that to make precipitation work, you also need bacteria.

"If that were true, then this would be the oldest evidence of life.

"But if I were to say that, people would yell and scream and say that there is no hard evidence."

Fortunately, geologists have already begun looking for such evidence, in similar rocks found in Greenland, dated 3.8 billion years.

"The great thing about our find, is it will bring in people here to Lake Hudson to carry out specialised studies and see whether there was life here or not," says Francis.

"Regardless of that, or the exact date of the rocks, the exciting thing is that we've seen a chemical signature that's never been seen before. That alone makes this an exciting discovery."





news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7639024.stm


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Fri, October 31, 2008 - 5:11 PM by Bobs

Birth of a new ocean

In a remote part of northern Ethiopia, the Earth’s crust is being stretched to breaking point, providing geologists with a unique opportunity to watch the birth of what may eventually become a new ocean. Lorraine Field, a PhD student, and Dr James Hammond, both from the Department of Earth Sciences, are two of the many scientists involved in documenting this remarkable event.

The African continent is slowly splitting apart along the East African Rift, a 3,000 kilometre-long series of deep basins and flanking mountain ranges. An enormous plume of hot, partially molten rock is rising diagonally from the core-mantle boundary, some 2,900 kilometres beneath Southern Africa, and erupting at the Earth’s surface, or cooling just beneath it, in the Afar region of Ethiopia. It is the rise of this plume that is stretching the Earth’s crust to breaking point.

In September 2005, a series of fissures suddenly opened up along a 60-kilometre section as the plate catastrophically responded to the forces pulling it apart. The rapidity and immense length of the rupture – an event unprecedented in scientific history – greatly excited geologists, who rushed to this very remote part of the world to start measuring what was going on. It began with a big earthquake and continued with a swarm of moderate tremors. About a week into the sequence, eruption of the Dabbahu Volcano threw ash and rocks into the air, causing the evacuation of 6,300 people from the region, while cracks appeared in the ground, some of them more than a metre wide. The only fatality was a camel that fell into a fissure. While these movements are only the beginnings of what would be needed to create a new ocean – the complete process taking millions of years – the Afar event has given geologists a unique opportunity to study the rupture process which normally occurs on the floor of deep oceans. In order to do this research, a consortium of universities was formed and divided into five interdisciplinary working groups. Each group has its own aims and experimental programme whilst linking with, and providing results to, the other groups.

Lorraine Field is studying the Dabbahu volcano, located close to where the rifting event occurred, which had never been known to erupt before it woke up in September 2005. Following a very strong earthquake, locals reported a dark column of ‘smoke’ that rose high into the atmosphere and spread out to form an umbrella-shaped cloud. Emissions darkened the area for three days and three nights. Many of the lava flows on the mountain are made of obsidian, a black volcanic glass, and the fissure which opened in 2005 emits fumes and steam with a very strong smell of bad eggs. Water being extremely scarce, the local Afaris have devised an ingenious method of capturing it. They build a pit next to a fumarole that is emitting steam and gases. A low circular retaining wall is then built around the fumarole and topped with branches and grasses. These provide a condensing surface for the vapour which collects in the pit or ‘boina’. Of some concern, however, is the level of contamination in the water from the various chemicals and minerals found in volcanic areas. Occasionally goats have died from drinking this water, so in order to test its quality the locals hold a shiny piece of obsidian over the fumarole. If a milky deposit forms, this indicates a ‘bad’ boina, so they move on to the next. Members of the consortium have brought back some water to analyse in the hope of developing a device, similar to the Aquatest kit reported in the last issue of re:search, but which tests for toxic metals rather than bacteria.

In September 2005, a series of fissures suddenly opened up along a 60km section as the plate catastrophically responded to the forces pulling it apart

Field’s base was in a small village called Digdigga, which comprises a long main street with a mix of square houses built of wood and traditional round Afar houses, made of a lattice framework of sticks covered in thatch, skins and sacking. Digdigga has a concrete school building, the grounds of which became Field’s base camp for nearly three weeks in January this year. The village is situated on an immense, flat, windy plain surrounded by volcanic mountains and cinder cones. Due to the lack of any vegetation, everything quickly becomes covered in a layer of dust, but the bare rocks mean that satellite images can be used to measure the way the Earth’s surface changes as faults move and as molten rock moves up and along the fissures within the rift valley.

Conditions are still too extreme for normal field mapping and so representative rock samples from key locations have been collected. In order to access Dabbahu mountain, the team hired eight camels to carry supplies, taking enough food and water for six days (and an emergency day), and keeping in touch with the base camp by satellite phone. The rocks Field collected will be analysed to determine how the chemistry of the magmas varies at different locations and how it changes over time. This in turn gives information about the depth of the magma chambers within the crust and the relationship between rifting and volcanism in this area.

The rocks collected will be analysed to determine the relationship between rifting and volcanism

James Hammond is using a variety of seismological techniques to image the crust and mantle beneath Afar. For example, seismic waves are generated during earthquakes, so a network of 40 seismometers has been set up across the plate boundary zone to record seismic activity. One of the seismic stations was placed in the chief’s house, close to the summit of Erta Ale. This extraordinary volcano is essentially an open conduit right down into the mantle. By comparing the arrival times of seismic waves at the seismometers, Hammond and his team will be able to generate a three-dimensional image of the crust, crust-mantle boundary, mantle structure and base of the lithosphere across the study area. This will allow some constraints to be placed on the location of melt in this region, enabling the team to obtain information on the mechanisms of break-up involved in the rifting process. In a nutshell, the consortium has the best array of imaging equipment deployed anywhere in the world to help it ‘see’ into an actively rifting continent.

But all this work will not just benefit the scientific community; it will also have an immediate impact on understanding and mitigating natural hazards in Afar. Consequently, the teams work closely with Ethiopian scientists and policy makers in the region. In addition, the project will provide training for Ethiopian doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers, and Ethiopian scientists will be trained in the techniques used by the consortium. Over the next five years, scientists from the UK, Ethiopia and many other countries will all come together to further our understanding of the processes involved in shaping the surface of the Earth.

Provided by University of Bristol



www.physorg.com/news144671445.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Wed, November 12, 2008 - 7:49 PM by offlinerob

University of Minnesota geology and geophysics researchers, along with their colleagues from China, have uncovered surprising effects of climate patterns on social upheaval and the fall of dynasties in ancient China.
Their research identifies a natural phenomenon that may have been the last straw for some Chinese dynasties: a weakening of the summer Asian Monsoons. Such weakening accompanied the fall of three dynasties and now could be lessening precipitation in northern China.

The study, led researchers from the University of Minnesota and Lanzhou University in China, appears in Science.

The work rests on climate records preserved in the layers of stone in a 118-millimeter-long stalagmite found in Wanxiang Cave in Gansu Province, China. By measuring amounts of the elements uranium and thorium throughout the stalagmite, the researchers could tell the date each layer was formed.

And by analyzing the "signatures" of two forms of oxygen in the stalagmite, they could match amounts of rainfall--a measure of summer monsoon strength--to those dates.

The stalagmite was formed over 1,810 years; stone at its base dates from A.D. 190, and stone at its tip was laid down in A.D. 2003, the year the stalagmite was collected.

"It is not intuitive that a record of surface weather would be preserved in underground cave deposits. This research nicely illustrates the promise of paleoclimate science to look beyond the obvious and see new possibilities," said David Verardo, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation's Paleoclimatology Program, which funded the research.

"Summer monsoon winds originate in the Indian Ocean and sweep into China," said Hai Cheng, corresponding author of the paper and a research scientist at the University of Minnesota. "When the summer monsoon is stronger, it pushes farther northwest into China."

These moisture-laden winds bring rain necessary for cultivating rice. But when the monsoon is weak, the rains stall farther south and east, depriving northern and western parts of China of summer rains. A lack of rainfall could have contributed to social upheaval and the fall of dynasties.

The researchers discovered that periods of weak summer monsoons coincided with the last years of the Tang, Yuan, and Ming dynasties, which are known to have been times of popular unrest. Conversely, the research group found that a strong summer monsoon prevailed during one of China's "golden ages," the Northern Song Dynasty.

The ample summer monsoon rains may have contributed to the rapid expansion of rice cultivation from southern China to the midsection of the country. During the Northern Song Dynasty, rice first became China's main staple crop, and China's population doubled.

"The waxing and waning of summer monsoon rains are just one piece of the puzzle of changing climate and culture around the world," said Larry Edwards, Distinguished McKnight University Professor in Geology and Geophysics and a co-author on the paper. For example, the study showed that the dry period at the end of the Tang Dynasty coincided with a previously identified drought halfway around the world, in Meso-America, which has been linked to the fall of the Mayan civilization.

The study also showed that the ample summer rains of the Northern Song Dynasty coincided with the beginning of the well-known Medieval Warm Period in Europe and Greenland. During this time--the late 10th century--Vikings colonized southern Greenland. Centuries later, a series of weak monsoons prevailed as Europe and Greenland shivered through what geologists call the Little Ice Age.

In the 14th and early 15th centuries, as the cold of the Little Ice Age settled into Greenland, the Vikings disappeared from there. At the same time, on the other side of the world, the weak monsoons of the 14th century coincided with the end of the Yuan Dynasty.

A second major finding concerns the relationship between temperature and the strength of the monsoons. For most of the last 1,810 years, as average temperatures rose, so, too, did the strength of the summer monsoon. That relationship flipped, however, around 1960, a sign that the late 20th century weakening of the monsoon and drying in northwestern China was caused by human activity.

If carbon dioxide is the culprit, as some have proposed, the drying trend may well continue in Inner Mongolia, northern China and neighboring areas on the fringes of the monsoon's reach, as society is likely to continue adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere for the foreseeable future.

If, however, the culprit is man-made soot, as others have proposed, the trend could be reversed, the researchers said, by reduction of soot emissions.

www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Thu, November 13, 2008 - 11:48 PM by offlinerob

Washington DC (SPX) Nov 14, 2008
Evolution isn't just for living organisms. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found that the mineral kingdom co-evolved with life, and that up to two thirds of the more than 4,000 known types of minerals on Earth can be directly or indirectly linked to biological activity. The finding, published in American Mineralogist, could aid scientists in the search for life on other planets.
Robert Hazen and Dominic Papineau of the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory, with six colleagues, reviewed the physical, chemical, and biological processes that gradually transformed about a dozen different primordial minerals in ancient interstellar dust grains to the thousands of mineral species on the present-day Earth. (Unlike biological species, each mineral species is defined by its characteristic chemical makeup and crystal structure.)

"It's a different way of looking at minerals from more traditional approaches," says Hazen."Mineral evolution is obviously different from Darwinian evolution-minerals don't mutate, reproduce or compete like living organisms. But we found both the variety and relative abundances of minerals have changed dramatically over more than 4.5 billion years of Earth's history."

All the chemical elements were present from the start in the Solar Systems' primordial dust, but they formed comparatively few minerals. Only after large bodies such as the Sun and planets congealed did there exist the extremes of temperature and pressure required to forge a large diversity of mineral species. Many elements were also too dispersed in the original dust clouds to be able to solidify into mineral crystals.

As the Solar System took shape through "gravitational clumping" of small, undifferentiated bodies-fragments of which are found today in the form of meteorites-about 60 different minerals made their appearance. Larger, planet-sized bodies, especially those with volcanic activity and bearing significant amounts of water, could have given rise to several hundred new mineral species.

Mars and Venus, which Hazen and coworkers estimate to have at least 500 different mineral species in their surface rocks, appear to have reached this stage in their mineral evolution.

However, only on Earth-at least in our Solar System-did mineral evolution progress to the next stages. A key factor was the churning of the planet's interior by plate tectonics, the process that drives the slow shifting continents and ocean basins over geological time.

Unique to Earth, plate tectonics created new kinds of physical and chemical environments where minerals could form, and thereby boosted mineral diversity to more than a thousand types.

What ultimately had the biggest impact on mineral evolution, however, was the origin of life, approximately 4 billion years ago. "Of the approximately 4,300 known mineral species on Earth, perhaps two thirds of them are biologically mediated," says Hazen.

"This is principally a consequence of our oxygen-rich atmosphere, which is a product of photosynthesis by microscopic algae." Many important minerals are oxidized weathering products, including ores of iron, copper and many other metals.

Microorganisms and plants also accelerated the production of diverse clay minerals. In the oceans, the evolution of organisms with shells and mineralized skeletons generated thick layered deposits of minerals such as calcite, which would be rare on a lifeless planet.

"For at least 2.5 billion years, and possibly since the emergence of life, Earth's mineralogy has evolved in parallel with biology," says Hazen. "One implication of this finding is that remote observations of the mineralogy of other moons and planets may provide crucial evidence for biological influences beyond Earth."

Stanford University geologist Gary Ernst called the study "breathtaking," saying that "the unique perspective presented in this paper may revolutionize the way Earth scientists regard minerals."
www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Wed, November 26, 2008 - 11:44 PM by Bobs

Plate tectonics started over 4 billion years ago, geochemists report

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new picture of the early Earth is emerging, including the surprising finding that plate tectonics may have started more than 4 billion years ago — much earlier than scientists had believed, according to new research by UCLA geochemists reported Nov. 27 in the journal Nature.


"We are proposing that there was plate-tectonic activity in the first 500 million years of Earth's history," said geochemistry professor Mark Harrison, director of UCLA's Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and co-author of the Nature paper. "We are reporting the first evidence of this phenomenon."

"Unlike the longstanding myth of a hellish, dry, desolate early Earth with no continents, it looks like as soon as the Earth formed, it fell into the same dynamic regime that continues today," Harrison said. "Plate tectonics was inevitable, life was inevitable. In the early Earth, there appear to have been oceans; there could have been life — completely contradictory to the cartoonish story we had been telling ourselves."

"We're revealing a new picture of what the early Earth might have looked like," said lead author Michelle Hopkins, a UCLA graduate student in Earth and space sciences. "In high school, we are taught to see the Earth as a red, hellish, molten-lava Earth. Now we're seeing a new picture, more like today, with continents, water, blue sky, blue ocean, much earlier than we thought."

The Earth is 4.5 billion years old. Some scientists think plate tectonics — the geological phenomenon involving the movement of huge crustal plates that make up the Earth's surface over the planet's molten interior — started 3.5 billion years ago, others that it began even more recently than that.

The research by Harrison, Hopkins and Craig Manning, a UCLA professor of geology and geochemistry, is based on their analysis of ancient mineral grains known as zircons found inside molten rocks, or magmas, from Western Australia that are about 3 billion years old. Zircons are heavy, durable minerals related to the synthetic cubic zirconium used for imitation diamonds and costume jewelry. The zircons studied in the Australian rocks are about twice the thickness of a human hair.

Hopkins analyzed the zircons with UCLA's high-resolution ion microprobe, an instrument that enables scientists to date and learn the exact composition of samples with enormous precision. The microprobe shoots a beam of ions, or charged atoms, at a sample, releasing from the sample its own ions, which are then analyzed in a mass spectrometer. Scientists can aim the beam of ions at specific microscopic areas of a sample and conduct a high-resolution isotope analysis of them without destroying the object.

"The microprobe is the perfect tool for determining the age of the zircons," Harrison said.

The analysis determined that some of the zircons found in the magmas were more than 4 billion years old. They were also found to have been formed in a region with heat flow far lower than the global average at that time.

"The global average heat flow in the Earth's first 500 million years was thought to be about 200 to 300 milliwatts per meter squared," Hopkins said. "Our zircons are indicating a heat flow of just 75 milliwatts per meter squared — the figure one would expect to find in subduction zones, where two plates converge, with one moving underneath the other."

"The data we are reporting are from zircons from between 4 billion and 4.2 billion years ago," Harrison said. "The evidence is indirect, but strong. We have assessed dozens of scenarios trying to imagine how to create magmas in a heat flow as low as we have found without plate tectonics, and nothing works; none of them explain the chemistry of the inclusions or the low melting temperature of the granites."

Evidence for water on Earth during the planet's first 500 million years is now overwhelming, according to Harrison.

"You don't have plate tectonics on a dry planet," he said.

Strong evidence for liquid water at or near the Earth's surface 4.3 billion years ago was presented by Harrison and colleagues in a Jan. 11, 2001, cover story in Nature.

"Five different lines of evidence now support that once radical hypothesis," Harrison said. "The inclusions we found tell us the zircons grew in water-saturated magmas. We now observe a surprisingly low geothermal gradient, a low rate at which temperature increases in the Earth. The only mechanism that we recognize that is consistent with everything we see is that the formation of these zircons was at a plate-tectonic boundary. In addition, the chemistry of the inclusions in the zircons is characteristic of the two kinds of magmas today that we see at place-tectonic boundaries."

"We developed the view that plate tectonics was impossible in the early Earth," Harrison added. "We have now made observations from the Hadean (the Earth's earliest geological eon) — these little grains contain a record about the conditions under which they formed — and the zircons are telling us that they formed in a region with anomalously low heat flow. Where in the modern Earth do you have heat flow that is one-third of the global average, which is what we found in the zircons? There is only one place where you have heat flow that low in which magmas are forming: convergent plate-tectonic boundaries."

Three years ago, Harrison and his colleagues applied a technique to determine the temperature of ancient zircons.

"We discovered the temperature at which these zircons formed was constant and very low," Harrison said. "You can't make a magma at any lower temperature than what we're seeing in these zircons. You look at artists' conceptions of the early Earth, with flying objects from outer space making large craters; that should make zircons hundreds of degrees centigrade hotter than the ones we see. The only way you can make zircons at the low temperature we see is if the melt is water-saturated. There had to be abundant water. That's a big surprise because our longstanding conception of the early Earth is that it was dry."

Source: University of California - Los Angeles



www.physorg.com/news146924511.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Wed, November 26, 2008 - 11:52 PM by offlinerob

A very interesting article,and it will be added to I'm sure when the area to the very North west of the Flinders ranges well past Arcaroola is studied in more depth.


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Tue, December 16, 2008 - 2:09 AM by Bobs

As Ice Melts, Antarctic Bedrock Is on the Move

As ice melts away from Antarctica, parts of the continental bedrock are rising in response -- and other parts are sinking, scientists have discovered.


The finding will give much needed perspective to satellite instruments that measure ice loss on the continent, and help improve estimates of future sea level rise.

"Our preliminary results show that we can dramatically improve our estimates of whether Antarctica is gaining or losing ice," said Terry Wilson, associate professor of earth sciences at Ohio State University.

Wilson reported the research in a press conference Monday, December 15, 2008 at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

These results come from a trio of global positioning system (GPS) sensor networks on the continent.

Wilson leads POLENET, a growing network of GPS trackers and seismic sensors implanted in the bedrock beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). POLENET is reoccupying sites previously measured by the West Antarctic GPS Network (WAGN) and the Transantarctic Mountains Deformation (TAMDEF) network.

In separate sessions at the meeting, Michael Bevis, Ohio Eminent Scholar in geodyamics and professor of earth sciences at Ohio State, presented results from WAGN, while doctoral student Michael Willis presented results from TAMDEF.

Taken together, the three projects are yielding the best view yet of what's happening under the ice.

When satellites measure the height of the WAIS, scientists calculate ice thickness by subtracting the height of the earth beneath it. They must take into account whether the bedrock is rising or falling. Ice weighs down the bedrock, but as the ice melts, the earth slowly rebounds.

Gravity measurements, too, rely on knowledge of the bedrock. As the crust under Antarctica rises, the mantle layer below it flows in to fill the gap. That mass change must be subtracted from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite measurements in order to isolate gravity changes caused by the thickening or thinning of the ice.

Before POLENET and its more spatially limited predecessors, scientists had few direct measurements of the bedrock. They had to rely on computer models, which now appear to be incorrect.

"When you compare how fast the earth is rising, and where, to the models of where ice is being lost and how much is lost -- they don't match," Wilson said. "There are places where the models predict no crustal uplift, where we see several millimeters of uplift per year. We even have evidence of other places sinking, which is not predicted by any of the models."

A few millimeters may sound like a small change, but it's actually quite large, she explained. Crustal uplift in parts of North America is measured on the scale of millimeters per year.

POLENET's GPS sensors measure how much the crust is rising or falling, while the seismic sensors measure the stiffness of the bedrock -- a key factor for predicting how much the bedrock will rise in the future.

"We're pinning down both parts of this problem, which will improve the correction made to the satellite data, which will in turn improve what we know about whether we're gaining ice or losing ice," Wilson said. Better estimates of sea level rise can then follow.

POLENET scientists have been implanting sensors in Antarctica since December 2007. The network will be complete in 2010 and will record data into 2012. Selected sites may remain as a permanent Antarctic observational network.

Source: Ohio State University



www.physorg.com/news148563736.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Tue, December 16, 2008 - 2:32 AM by Bobs

Ancient Magma 'Superpiles' May Have Shaped The Continents

Two giant plumes of hot rock deep within the earth are linked to the plate motions that shape the continents, researchers have found.

The two superplumes, one beneath Hawaii and the other beneath Africa, have likely existed for at least 200 million years, explained Wendy Panero, assistant professor of earth sciences at Ohio State University.

The giant plumes -- or "superpiles" as Panero calls them -- rise from the bottom of Earth's mantle, just above our planet's core. Each is larger than the continental United States. And each is surrounded by a wall of plates from Earth's crust that have sunk into the mantle.

She and her colleagues reported their findings at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Computer models have connected the piles to the sunken former plates, but it's currently unclear which one spawned the other, Panero said. Plates sink into the mantle as part of the normal processes that shape the continents. But which came first, the piles or the plates, the researchers simply do not know.

"Do these superpiles organize plate motions, or do plate motions organize the superpiles? I don't know if it's truly a chicken-or-egg kind of question, but the locations of the two piles do seem to be related to where the continents are today, and where the last supercontinent would have been 200 million years ago," she said.

That supercontinent was Pangea, and its breakup eventually led to the seven continents we know today.

Scientists first proposed the existence of the superpiles more than a decade ago. Earthquakes offer an opportunity to study them, since they slow the seismic waves that pass through them. Scientists combine the seismic data with what they know about Earth's interior to create computer models and learn more.

But to date, the seismic images have created a mystery: they suggest that the superpiles have remained in the same locations, unchanged for hundreds of millions of years.

"That's a problem," Panero said. "We know that the rest of the mantle is always moving. So why are the piles still there?"

Hot rock constantly migrates from the base of the mantle up to the crust, she explained. Hot portions of the mantle rise, and cool portions fall. Continental plates emerge, then sink back into the earth.

But the presence of the superpiles and the location of subducted plates suggest that the two superpiles have likely remained fixed to the Earth's core while the rest of the mantle has churned around them for millions of years.

Unlocking this mystery is the goal of the Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research (CIDER) collaboration, a group of researchers from across the United States who are attempting to unite many different disciplines in the study of Earth's interior.

Panero provides CIDER her expertise in mineral physics; others specialize in geodynamics, geomagnetism, seismology, and geochemistry. Together, they have assembled a new model that suggests why the two superpiles are so stable, and what they are made of.

As it turns out, just a tiny difference in chemical composition can keep the superpiles in place, they found.

The superpiles contain slightly more iron than the rest of the mantle; their composition likely consists of 11-13 percent iron instead of 10-12 percent. But that small change is enough to make the superpiles denser than their surroundings.

"Material that is more dense is going to sink to the base of the mantle," Panero said. "It would normally spread out at that point, but in this case we have subducting plates that are coming down from above and keeping the piles contained."

CIDER will continue to explore the link between the superpiles and the plates that surround them. The researchers will also work to explain the relationship between the superpiles and other mantle plumes that rise above them, which feed hotspots such as those beneath Hawaii and mid-ocean ridges. Ultimately, they hope to determine whether the superpiles may have contributed to the breakup of Pangea.

Provided by Ohio State University



www.physorg.com/news148576119.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Tue, December 30, 2008 - 7:58 PM by offlinerob

Coastal bluffs reveal secrets of past

1:34 PM
By Dave Schwab - La Jolla Light









It's a favored surf spot off La Jolla's shoreline today, but millions of years ago it was a volcanic "hot spot."

"It" is the stretch of beach from Scripps Pier north to Torrey Pines that has a very special geology.

"It's a vertical, volcanic intrusion," noted Thomas A. Demere, Ph.D., curator of paleontology at the San Diego Natural History Museum. "Distinctively black basaltic rocks deposited there, right out in the surf zone, are 10 to 12 million years old."

Demere added this remnant volcanic formation lies just beneath the cliff bluffs where the National Marine Fisheries Service Science Center on UCSD's campus sits. At low tide, standing on the beach in that area looking south toward La Jolla, the linear nature of that volcanic deposit is obvious.

"It's really quite striking," Demere added, "quite different from the light brown sandstones that compose the cliffs."

Geologic "sleuths" like Demere are piecing together the geologic riddle of San Diego's paleontological history. Evidence buried in, or uncovered by, natural erosion reveals a past topography much different than today, when an ancient oceanic crustal tectonic plate created an archipelago of volcanic islands producing massive volumes of magma that later congealed into rock.

Also recorded in the historical record of coastal San Diego are periods of higher rainfall and subtropical climates that supported coastal rain forests with exotic plants and animals. With the coming and going of worldwide ice ages, San Diego's coastline endured periods of "drowning," as well as widespread earthquake faulting.

La Jolla's downtown Village has its own unique geologic pedigree, Demere said.

"La Jolla is built on a series of sea floors that are related to climatic fluctuations over the last 120,000 years," he said. "Scripps Park down by the Cove on that nice broad, flat surface is a sea floor 85,000 years old. The flat surface on Prospect Street, the central portion of La Jolla Village, is another sea floor 120,000 years old."

Terraced sea floors like those in La Jolla are the consequence of ice ages and intervening periods of global warming, in roughly 100,000-year cycles that caused wide discrepancies in sea levels.

"The peak of the last ice age, 18,000 years ago, sea level was up to 400 feet lower than it is today," noted Demere.

Natural wave action led to the carving out of platforms resulting in the current topography.
www.lajollalight.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

Bobs Wed, January 7, 2009 - 12:17 AM by Bobs

Did Earth's Twin Cores Spark Plate Tectonics?
Michael Reilly, Discovery News


Jan. 6, 2009 -- It's a classic image from every youngster's science textbook: a cutaway image of Earth's interior. The brown crust is paper-thin; the warm mantle orange, the seething liquid of the outer core yellow, and at the center the core, a ball of solid, red-hot iron.

Now a new theory aims to rewrite it all by proposing the seemingly impossible: Earth has not one but two inner cores.

The idea stems from an ancient, cataclysmic collision that scientists believe occurred when a Mars-sized object hit Earth about 4.45 billion years ago. The young Earth was still so hot that it was mostly molten, and debris flung from the impact is thought to have formed the moon.

Haluk Cetin and Fugen Ozkirim of Murray State University think the core of the Mars-sized object may have been left behind inside Earth, and that it sank down near the original inner core. There the two may still remain, either separate or as conjoined twins, locked in a tight orbit.

Their case is largely circumstantial and speculative, Cetin admitted.

"We have no solid evidence yet, and we're not saying 100 percent that it still exists," he said. "The interior of Earth is a very hard place to study."

The ancient collision is a widely accepted phenomenon. But most scientists believe the incredible pressure at the center of the planet would've long since pushed the two cores into each other.

Still, the inner core is a mysterious place. Recently, scientists discovered that it rotates faster than the rest of the planet. And a study last year of how seismic waves propagate through the iron showed that the core is split into two distinct regions.

Beyond that, little is known. But Cetin and Ozkirim think a dual inner core can explain the rise of plate tectonics, and help explain why the planet remains hotter today than it should be, given its size.

"If this is true, it would change all Earth models as we know them," Cetin said. "If not, and these two cores coalesced early on, we would have less to say, but it could still be how plate tectonics got started."

Based on models of Earth's interior, Cetin thinks the two cores rotate in opposite directions, like the wheels of a pasta maker. Their motion would suck in magma from behind and spit it out in front. If this motion persisted for long enough, it could set up a giant current of circulation that would push plates of crust apart in front, and suck them down into the mantle in back.

Friction generated by the motion would keep the planet hot.

Scientists asked to comment on this hypothesis were extremely skeptical. Some asked not to be quoted, citing insufficient evidence to make a well-reasoned critique of the study, which the authors presented last month at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

"In terms of its volume, and even its mass, the Earth's inner core is quite small relative to the whole planet, about 1 percent," Paul Richards of Columbia University said. "I seriously doubt that inner core dynamics could play a significant role in moving the tectonic plates."




dsc.discovery.com/news/2009...cores.html


Re: Geology Rocks! 2

rob Wed, January 7, 2009 - 1:14 AM by offlinerob

I think with that theory the scenario might go something like this : Light the blue touch paper and stand well back !


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /Scientists publish first ever evidence of asteroids with earth-like crust (1/10/2009)

rob Sat, January 10, 2009 - 5:28 PM by offlinerob

Two rare meteorites found in Antarctica two years ago are from a previously unknown, ancient asteroid with an outer layer or crust similar in composition to the crust of Earth's continents, reports a research team primarily composed of geochemists from the University of Maryland.

Published in the January 8 issue of the journal Nature, this is the first ever finding of material from an asteroid with a crust like Earth's. The discovery also represents the oldest example of rock with this composition ever found.

These meteorites point "to previously unrecognized diversity" of materials formed early in the history of the Solar System, write authors James Day, Richard Ash, Jeremy Bellucci, William McDonough and Richard Walker of the University of Maryland; Yang Liu and Lawrence Taylor of the University of Tennessee and Douglas Rumble III of the Carnegie Institution for Science.

"What is most unusual about these rocks is that they have compositions similar to Earth's andesite continental crust -- what the rock beneath our feet is made of," said first author Day, who is a research scientist in Maryland's department of geology. "No meteorites like this have ever been seen before."

Day explained that his team focused their investigations on how such different Solar System bodies could have crusts with such similar compositions. "We show that this occurred because of limited melting of the asteroid, and thus illustrate that the formation of andesite crust has occurred in our solar system by processes other than plate tectonics, which is the generally accepted process that created the crust of Earth."

The two meteorites (numbered GRA 06128 and GRA 06129) were discovered in the Graves Nunatak Icefield during the US Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) 2006/2007 field season. Day and his colleagues immediately recognized that these meteorites were unusual because of elevated contents of a light-colored feldspar mineral called oligoclase. "Our age results point to these rocks being over 4.52 billion years old and that they formed during the birth of the Solar System. Combined with the oxygen isotope data, this age points to their origin from an asteroid rather than a planet," he said.
www.astronomyreport.com

Andesite Asteroids
There are a number of asteroids in the asteroid belt that may have properties like the GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 meteorites including the asteroid (2867) Steins, which was studied by the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft during a flyby this past September. These so-called E-type asteroids reflect the Sun's light very brightly, as would be predicted for a body with a crust made of feldspar.

According to Day and his colleagues, finding pieces of meteorites with andesite compositions is important because they not only point to a previously unrecognized diversity of Solar System materials, but also to a new mechanism to generate andesite crust. On the present-day Earth, this occurs dominantly through plates colliding and subduction - where one plate slides beneath another. Subduction forces water back into the mantle aiding melting and generating arc volcanoes, such as the Pacific Rim of Fire - in this way new crust is formed.

"Our studies of the GRA meteorites suggest similar crust compositions may be formed via melting of materials in planets that are initially volatile- and possibly water-rich, like the Earth probably was when if first formed" said Day." A major uncertainty is how evolved crust formed in the early Solar System and these meteorites are a piece in the puzzle to understanding these processes."

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the University of Maryland


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /Ancient supercontinent was a diamond factory

rob Wed, January 14, 2009 - 2:13 PM by offlinerob

Talk about deep, dark secrets. Rare "ultra-deep" diamonds are valuable - not because they look good twinkling on a newlywed's finger - but because of what they can tell us about conditions far below the Earth's crust.

Now a find of these unusual gems in Australia has provided new clues to how they were formed.

The diamonds, which are white and a few millimetres across, were found by a mineral exploration company just outside the village of Eurelia, some 300 kilometres north of Adelaide, in southern Australia. From there, they were sent to Ralf Tappert, a diamond expert at the University of Adelaide.

Tappert and colleagues say minerals found trapped inside the Eurelia diamonds could only have formed more than 670 kilometres (416 miles) beneath the surface of the Earth - a distance greater than that between Boston and Washington, DC.

Clues from the deep
"The vast majority of diamonds worldwide form at depths between 150 km and 250 km, within the mantle roots of ancient continental plates," says Tappert. "These diamonds formed in the Earth's lower mantle at depths greater than 670 km, which is much deeper than 'normal' diamonds."

Fewer than a dozen ultra-deep diamonds have been found in various corners of the globe since the 1990s. Sites range from Canada and Brazil to Africa - and now Australia.

"Deep diamonds are important because they are the only natural samples that we have from the lower mantle," says Catherine McCammon, a geologist at the University of Bayreuth in Germany. "This makes them an invaluable set of samples - much like the lunar rocks are to our studies of the moon."

The Eurelia gems contain information about the carbon they were made from. Their heavy carbon isotope signatures suggest the carbon was once contained in marine carbonates lying on the ocean floor.

'Oddball' gems
Location, though, provides researchers with a common thread for the Brazilian, African and Australian deep diamonds, which could explain how they were born. All six groups of diamonds were found in areas that would once have lined the edge of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana.

"Deep diamonds have always been treated like oddball diamonds," says Tappert. "We don't really know what their origin is. With the discovery of the ones in Australia we start to get a pattern."

Their geographic spread suggests that all these ultra-deep diamonds were formed in the same way: as the oceanic crust dived down beneath Gondwana - a process known as subduction - it would have dragged carbon down to the lower mantle, transforming it into graphite and then diamond along the way.

Eventually, kimberlites - volcanic rocks named after the town of Kimberley in South Africa - are propelled to the surface during rapid eruptions, bringing the gems up to the surface.

Surprisingly young
According to John Ludden of the British Geological Survey, if the theory were proven true, it would mean the Eurelia diamonds are much younger than most diamonds are thought to be.

"Many of the world's diamonds are thought to have been sampled from subducted crust in the very early Earth, 3 billion years ago," says Ludden.

Yet Tappert's theory suggests these diamonds would have been formed about 300 million years ago. "This may well result in a revision of exploration models for kimberlites and the diamonds they host, as to date exploration has focused on very old rock units of the early Earth," Ludden told New Scientist.

McCammon says Tappert's theory is "plausible" but just "one among possible models". She says not all deep diamonds fit the Gondwana model, but adds that the new gems "proved a concrete idea that can be tested by others in the community".

Journal reference: Geology (vol 37, p 43)
www.newscientist.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 / Controversy Over World’s Oldest Traces Of Life

rob Sun, March 1, 2009 - 9:43 PM by offlinerob

ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2009) — The argument over whether an outcrop of rock in South West Greenland contains the earliest known traces of life on Earth has been reignited, in a study published in the Journal of the Geological Society. The research, led by Martin J. Whitehouse at the Swedish Museum of Natural History, argues that the controversial rocks "cannot host evidence of Earth’s oldest life," reopening the debate over where the oldest traces of life are located.



The small island of Akilia has long been the centre of attention for scientists looking for early evidence of life. Research carried out in 1996 argued that a five metre wide outcrop of rock on the island contained graphite with depleted levels of 13C. Carbon isotopes are frequently used to search for evidence of early life, because the lightest form of carbon, 12C (atomic weight 12), is preferred in biological processes as it requires less energy to be used by organisms. This results in heavier forms, such as 13C, being less concentrated, which might account for the depleted levels found in the rocks at Akilia.

Crucial to the dating of these traces was analysing the cross-cutting intrusions made by igneous rocks into the outcrop. Whatever is cross-cut must be older than the intruding rocks, so obtaining a date for the intrusive rock was vital. When these were claimed to be at least 3.85 billion years old, it seemed that Akilia did indeed hold evidence of the oldest traces of life on Earth.

Since then, many critics have cast doubt on the findings. Over billions of years, the rocks have undergone countless changes to their structure, being folded, distorted, heated and compressed to such an extent that their mineral composition is very different now to what it was originally. The dating of the intrusive rock has also been questioned .Nevertheless, in July 2006, an international team of scientists, led by Craig E. Manning at UCLA, published a paper claiming that they had proved conclusively that the traces of life were older than 3.8 billion years, after having mapped the area extensively. They argued that the rocks formed part of a volcanic stratigraphy, with igneous intrusions, using the cross-cutting relationships between the rocks as an important part of their theory.

The new research, led by Martin J. Whitehouse at the Swedish Museum of Natural History and Nordic Center for Earth Evolution, casts doubt on this interpretation. The researchers present new evidence demonstrating that the cross-cutting relationships are instead caused by tectonic activity, and represent a deformed fault or unconformity. If so, the age of the intrusive rock is irrelevant to the dating of the graphite, and it could well be older. Because of this, the scientists turned their attention to dating the graphite-containing rocks themselves, and found no evidence that they are any older than c. 3.67 billion years.

"The rocks of Akilia provide no evidence that life existed at or before c. 3.82 Ga, or indeed before 3.67 Ga," they conclude.

The age of the Earth itself is around 4.5 billion years. If life complex enough to have the ability to fractionate carbon were to exist at 3.8 billion years, this would suggest life originated even earlier. The Hadean eon, 3.8 – 4.5 billion years ago, is thought to have been an environment extremely hostile to life. In addition to surviving this period, such early life would have had to contend with the ‘Late Heavy Bombardment’ between 3.8 and 4.1 billion years ago, when a large number of impact craters on the Moon suggest that both the Earth and the Moon underwent significant bombardment, probably by collision with asteroids.

Journal reference:

M J Whitehouse, J S Myers & C M Fedo. The Akilia Controversy: field, structural and geochronological evidence questions interpretations of >3.8 Ga life in SW Greenland. Journal of the Geological Society, 2009; 166 (2): 335-348 DOI: 10.1144/0016-76492008-070
Adapted from materials provided by Geological Society of London, via AlphaGalileo.
www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 / New Zealand And New Caledonia Geographically Connected: Ocean's Journey Towards The Center Of The Earth

rob Sun, March 8, 2009 - 4:42 AM by offlinerob

ScienceDaily (Mar. 8, 2009) — A Monash geoscientist and a team of international researchers have discovered the existence of an ocean floor was destroyed 50 to 20 million years ago, proving that New Caledonia and New Zealand are geographically connected.

Using new computer modelling programs Wouter Schellart and the team reconstructed the prehistoric cataclysm that took place when a tectonic plate between Australia and New Zealand was subducted 1100 kilometres into the Earth's interior and at the same time formed a long chain of volcanic islands at the surface.

Mr Schellart conducted the research, published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in collaboration with Brian Kennett from ANU (Canberra) and Wim Spakman and Maisha Amaru from Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

"Until now many geologists have only looked at New Caledonia and New Zealand separately and didn't see a connection, Mr Schellart said.

"In our new reconstruction, which looked at a much larger region including eastern Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and New Guinea, we saw a large number of similarities between New Caledonia and northern New Zealand in terms of geology, structure, volcanism and timing of geological events.

"We then searched deep within the Earth for proof of a connection and found the evidence 1100 km below the Tasman Sea in the form of a subducted tectonic plate.

"We combined reconstructions of the tectonic plates that cover the Earth's surface with seismic tomography, a technique that allows one to look deep into the Earth's interior using seismic waves that travel through the Earth's interior to map different regions.

"We are now able to say a tectonic plate about 70 km thick, some 2500 km long and 700 km wide was subducted into the Earth's interior.

"The discovery means there was a geographical connection between New Caledonia and New Zealand between 50 and 20 million years ago by a long chain of volcanic islands. This could be important for the migration of certain plant and animal species at that time," Mr Schellart said.

Mr Schellart said the new discovery diffuses the debate about whether the continents and micro-continents in the Southwest Pacific have been completely separated since 100 million years ago and helps to explain some of the mysteries surrounding evolution in the region.

"As geologists present more data, and computer modelling programs become more hi-tech, it is likely we will learn more about our Earth's history and the processes of evolution."
www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 / Earth's Crust Melts Easier Than Thought

rob Thu, March 26, 2009 - 2:35 AM by offlinerob

Washington DC (SPX) Mar 26, 2009
Earth's crust melts easier than previously thought, scientists have discovered. In a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Nature, geologists report results of a study of how well rocks conduct heat at different temperatures.
They found that as rocks get hotter in Earth's crust, they become better insulators and poorer conductors.

The findings provide insights into how magmas are formed, the scientists say, and will lead to better models of continental collision and the formation of mountain belts.

"These results shed important light on a geologic question: how large bodies of granite magma can be formed in Earth's crust," said Sonia Esperanca, a program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Division of Earth Sciences, which funded the research.

"In the presence of external heat sources, rocks heat up more efficiently than previously thought," said geologist Alan Whittington of the University of Missouri.

"We applied our findings to computer models that predict what happens to rocks when they get buried and heat up in mountain belts, such as the Himalayas today or the Black Hills in South Dakota in the geologic past.

"We found that strain heating, caused by tectonic movements during mountain belt formation, easily triggers crustal melting."

In the study, the researchers used a laser-based technique to determine how long it took heat to conduct through different rock samples. In all their samples, thermal diffusivity, or how well a material conducts heat, decreased rapidly with increasing temperatures.

The thermal diffusivity of hot rocks and magmas was half that of what had been previously assumed.

"Most crustal melting on Earth comes from intrusions of hot basaltic magma from the Earth's mantle," said Peter Nabelek, also a geologist at the University of Missouri. "The problem is that during continental collisions, we don't see intrusions of basaltic magma into continental crust."

These experiments suggest that because of low thermal diffusivity, strain heating is much faster and more efficient. Once rocks get heated, they stay hotter for much longer, Nabelek said.

The processes take millions of years to happen, and scientists can only simulate them on a computer. The new data will allow them to create computer models that more accurately represent processes that occur during continental collisions.

www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Wed, April 8, 2009 - 3:35 PM by offlinerob


This is part article only,follow the link to read the complete transcript:

GARY ANDERSON was not around to see a backhoe tear up the buffalo grass at his ranch near Akron, Colorado. But he was watching a few weeks later when the technicians came to dump instruments and insulation into their 2-metre-deep hole.

What they left behind didn't look like much: an anonymous mound of dirt and, a few paces away, a spindly metal framework supporting a solar panel. All Anderson knew was that he was helping to host some kind of science experiment. It wouldn't be any trouble, he'd been told, and it wouldn't disturb the cattle. After a couple of years the people who installed it would come and take it away again.

He had in fact become part of what is probably the most ambitious seismological project ever conducted. Its name is USArray and its aim is to run what amounts to an ultrasound scan over the 48 contiguous states of the US. Through the seismic shudders and murmurs that rack Earth's innards, it will build up an unprecedented 3D picture of what lies beneath North America.

It is a mammoth undertaking, during which USArray's scanner - a set of 400 transportable seismometers - will sweep all the way from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Having started off in California in 2004, it is now just east of the Rockies, covering a north-south swathe stretching from Montana's border with Canada down past El Paso on the Texas-Mexico border. By 2013, it should have reached the north-east coast, and its mission end.

Though not yet at the halfway stage, the project is already bringing the rocky underbelly of the US into unprecedented focus. Geologists are using this rich source of information to gain new understanding of the continent's tumultuous past - and what its future holds.

For something so fundamental, our idea of what lies beneath our feet is sketchy at best. It is only half a century since geologists firmed up the now standard theory of plate tectonics. This is the notion that Earth's uppermost layers are segmented like a jigsaw puzzle whose pieces - vast "plates" carrying whole continents or chunks of ocean - are constantly on the move. Where two plates collide, we now know, one often dives beneath the other. That process, known as subduction, can create forces strong enough to build up spectacular mountain ranges such as the still-growing Andes in South America or the Rocky mountains of the western US and Canada.

In the heat and pressure of the mantle beneath Earth's surface, the subducted rock deforms and slowly flows, circulating on timescales of millions of years. Eventually, it can force its way back to the surface, prising apart two plates at another tectonic weak point. The mid-Atlantic ridge, at the eastern edge of the North American plate, is a classic example of this process in action.

What we don't yet know is exactly what happens to the rock during its tour of Earth's interior. How does its path deep underground relate to features we can see on the surface? Is the diving of plates a smoothly flowing process or a messy, bitty, stop-start affair?

USArray will allow geologists to poke around under the hood, inspecting Earth's internal workings right down to where the mantle touches the iron-rich core 2900 kilometres below the surface - and perhaps even further down. "It is our version of the Hubble Space Telescope. With it, we'll be able to view Earth in a fundamentally different way," says Matthew Fouch, a geophysicist at Arizona State University in Tempe.
www.newscientist.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sun, May 10, 2009 - 10:40 PM by offlinerob

College Park MD (SPX) May 11, 2009
An international team of geologists may have uncovered the answer to an age-old question - an ice-age-old question, that is. It appears that Earth's earliest ice age may have been due to the rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, which consumed atmospheric greenhouse gases and chilled the earth.
Scientists from the University of Maryland, including post-doctoral fellows Boswell Wing and Sang-Tae Kim, graduate student Margaret Baker, and professors Alan J. Kaufman and James Farquhar, along with colleagues in Germany, South Africa, Canada and the United States, uncovered evidence that the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere - generally known as the Great Oxygenation Event - coincided with the first widespread ice age on the planet.

"We can now put our hands on the rock library that preserves evidence of irreversible atmospheric change," said Kaufman. "This singular event had a profound effect on the climate, and also on life."

Using sulfur isotopes to determine the oxygen content of ~2.3 billion year-old rocks in the Transvaal Supergroup in South Africa, they found evidence of a sudden increase in atmospheric oxygen that broadly coincided with physical evidence of glacial debris, and geochemical evidence of a new world-order for the carbon cycle.

"The sulfur isotope change we recorded coincided with the first known anomaly in the carbon cycle. This may have resulted from the diversification of photosynthetic life that produced the oxygen that changed the atmosphere," Kaufman said.

Two and a half billion years ago, before the Earth's atmosphere contained appreciable oxygen, photosynthetic bacteria gave off oxygen that first likely oxygenated the surface of the ocean, and only later the atmosphere.

The first formed oxygen reacted with iron in the oceans, creating iron oxides that settled to the ocean floor in sediments called banded iron-formations - layered deposits of red-brown rock that accumulated in ocean basins worldwide. Later, once the iron was used up, oxygen escaped from the oceans and started filling up the atmosphere.

Once oxygen made it into the atmosphere, the scientists suggest that it reacted with methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, to form carbon dioxide, which is 62 times less effective at warming the surface of the planet. "With less warming potential, surface temperatures may have plummeted, resulting in globe-encompassing glaciers and sea ice" said Kaufman.

In addition to its affect on climate, the rise in oxygen stimulated the rise in stratospheric ozone, our global sunscreen. This gas layer, which lies between 12 and 30 miles above the surface, decreased the amount of damaging ultraviolet sunrays reaching the oceans, allowing photosynthetic organisms that previously lived deeper down, to move up to the surface, and hence increase their output of oxygen, further building up stratospheric ozone.

"New oxygen in the atmosphere would also have stimulated weathering processes, delivering more nutrients to the seas, and may have also pushed biological evolution towards eukaryotes, which require free oxygen for important biosynthetic pathways," said Kaufman.

The result of the Great Oxidation Event, according to Kaufman and his colleagues, was a complete transformation of Earth's atmosphere, of its climate, and of the life that populated its surface. The study is published in the May issue of Geology.

www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Tue, May 19, 2009 - 4:39 PM by offlinerob

Panama, Panama (SPX) May 19, 2009
The geologic faults responsible for the rise of the eastern Andes mountains in Colombia became active 25 million years ago-18 million years before the previously accepted start date for the Andes' rise, according to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, the University of Potsdam in Germany and Ecopetrol in Colombia.
"No one had ever dated mountain-building events in the eastern range of the Colombian Andes," said Mauricio Parra, a former doctoral candidate at the University of Potsdam (now a postdoctoral fellow with the University of Texas) and lead author.

"This eastern sector of America's backbone turned out to be far more ancient here than in the central Andes, where the eastern ranges probably began to form only about 10 million years ago."

The team integrated new geologic maps that illustrate tectonic thrusting and faulting, information about the origins and movements of sediments and the location and age of plant pollen in the sediments, as well as zircon-fission track analysis to provide an unusually thorough description of basin and range formation.

As mountain ranges rise, rainfall and erosion wash minerals like zircon from rocks of volcanic origin into adjacent basins, where they accumulate to form sedimentary rocks. Zircon contains traces of uranium. As the uranium decays, trails of radiation damage accumulate in the zircon crystals.

At high temperatures, fission tracks disappear like the mark of a knife disappears from a soft block of butter. By counting the microscopic fission tracks in zircon minerals, researchers can tell how long ago sediments formed and how deeply they were buried.

Classification of nearly 17,000 pollen grains made it possible to clearly delimit the age of sedimentary layers.

The use of these complementary techniques led the team to postulate that the rapid advance of a sinking wedge of material as part of tectonic events 31 million years ago may have set the stage for the subsequent rise of the range.

"The date that mountain building began is critical to those of us who want to understand the movement of ancient animals and plants across the landscape and to engineers looking for oil and gas," said Carlos Jaramillo, staff scientist from STRI. "We are still trying to put together a big tectonic jigsaw puzzle to figure out how this part of the world formed
www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sun, May 31, 2009 - 12:53 AM by offlinerob

Tempe AZ (SPX) May 28, 2009
There are very few places in the world where dynamic activity taking place beneath Earth's surface goes undetected. Volcanoes, earthquakes, and even the sudden uplifting or sinking of the ground are all visible results of restlessness far below, but according to research by Arizona State University (ASU) seismologists, dynamic activity deep beneath us isn't always expressed on the surface.
The Great Basin in the western United States is a desert region largely devoid of major surface changes. The area consists of small mountain ranges separated by valleys and includes most of Nevada, the western half of Utah and portions of other nearby states.

For tens of millions of years, the Great Basin has been undergoing extension--the stretching of Earth's crust.

While studying the extension of the region, geologist John West of ASU was surprised to find that something unusual existed beneath this area's surface.

West and colleagues found that portions of the lithosphere--the crust and uppermost mantle of the Earth--had sunk into the more fluid upper mantle beneath the Great Basin and formed a large cylindrical blob of cold material far below the surface of central Nevada.

It was an extremely unexpected finding in a location that showed no corresponding changes in surface topography or volcanic activity, West says.

West compared his unusual results of the area with tomography models--CAT scans of the inside of Earth--done by geologist Jeff Roth, also of ASU. West and Roth are graduate students; working with their advisor, Matthew Fouch, the team concluded that they had found a lithospheric drip.

Results of their research, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), were published in the May 24 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience.

"The results provide important insights into fine-scale mantle convection processes, and their possible connections with volcanism and mountain-building on Earth's surface," said Greg Anderson, program director in NSF's Division of Earth Sciences.

A lithospheric drip can be envisioned as honey dripping off a spoon, where an initial lithospheric blob is followed by a long tail of material.

When a small, high-density mass is embedded near the base of the crust and the area is warmed up, the high-density piece will be heavier than the area around it and it will start sinking. As it drops, material in the lithosphere starts flowing into the newly created conduit.

Seismic images of mantle structure beneath the region provided additional evidence, showing a large cylindrical mass 100 km wide and at least 500 km tall (about 60 by 300 miles).

"As a general rule, I have been anti-drip since my early days as a scientist," admits Fouch. "The idea of a lithospheric drip has been used many times over the years to explain things like volcanism, surface uplift, surface subsidence, but you could never really confirm it--and until now no one has caught a drip in the act, so to speak."

Originally, the team didn't think any visible signs appeared on the surface.

"We wondered how you could have something like a drip that is drawing material into its center when the surface of the whole area is stretching apart," says Fouch.

"But it turns out that there is an area right above the drip, in fact the only area in the Great Basin, that is currently undergoing contraction. John's finding of a drip is therefore informing geologists to develop a new paradigm of Great Basin evolution."

Scientists have known about the contraction for some time, but have been arguing about its cause.

As a drip forms, surrounding material is drawn in behind it; this means that the surface should be contracting toward the center of the basin. Since contraction is an expected consequence of a drip, a lithospheric drip could well be the answer to what is being observed in the Great Basin.

"Many in the scientific community thought it couldn't be a drip because there wasn't any elevation change or surface manifestation, and a drip has historically always been connected with major surface changes," says West.

"But those features aren't required to have the drip. Under certain conditions, like in the Great Basin, drips can form with little or no corresponding changes in surface topography or volcanic activity."

All the numerical models computed by the team suggest that the drip isn't going to cause things to sink down or pop up quickly, or cause lots of earthquakes.

There would likely be little or no impact on the people living above the drip. The team believes that the drip is a transient process that started some 15-20 million years ago, and probably recently detached from the overlying plate.

"This finding would not have been possible without the incredible wealth of seismic data captured by EarthScope's Transportable Array (TA) as it moved across the western United States," says West.

"We had access to data from a few long-term stations in the region, but the excellent data and 75-km grid spacing of the TA is what made these results possible."

This is a great example "of science in action," says Fouch.

"We went in not expecting to find this. Instead, we came up with a hypothesis that was not what anyone had proposed previously for the area, and then we tested the hypothesis with as many different types of data as we could find.

"In all cases so far it has held up. We're excited to see how this discovery plays a role in the development of new ideas about the geologic history of the western U.S."

www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Thu, July 30, 2009 - 5:20 AM by offlinerob

Washington DC (SPX) Jul 29, 2009
A new analysis of jade found along the Motagua fault that bisects Guatemala is underscoring the fact that this region has a more complex geologic history than previously thought.
Because jade and other associated metamorphic rocks are found on both sides of the fault, and because the jade to the north is younger by about 60 million years, a team of geologists posits in a new research paper that the North American and Caribbean plates have done more than simply slide past each other: they have collided. Twice.

"Now we understand what has happened in Guatemala, geologically," says one of the authors, Hannes Brueckner, Professor of Geology at Queens College, City University of New York. "Our new research is filling in information about plate tectonics for an area of the world that needed sorting."

Jade is a cultural term for two rare metamorphic rocks known as jadeitite (as discussed in the current research) and nephrite that are both extremely tough and have been used as tools and talismans throughout the world. The jadeitite (or jadeite jade) is a sort of scar tissue from some collisions between Earth's plates.

As ocean crust is pushed under another block, or subducted, pressure increases with only modest rise in temperature, squeezing and drying the rocks without melting them. Jade precipitates from fluids flowing up the subduction channel and into the chilled, overlying mantle that becomes serpentinite.

The serpentinite assemblage, which includes jade and has a relatively low density, can be uplifted during subsequent continental collisions and extruded along the band of the collision boundary, such as those found in the Alps, California, Iran, Russia, and other parts of the world.

The Motagua fault is one of three subparallel left-lateral strike-slip faults (with horizontal motion) in Guatemala and forms the boundary between the North American and Caribbean tectonic plates.

In an earlier paper, the team of authors found evidence of two different collisions by dating mica found in collisional rocks (including jade) from the North American side of the fault to about 70 million years ago and from the southern side (or the Caribbean plate) to between 120 and 130 million years ago.

But mica dates can be "reset" by subsequent heating. Now, the authors have turned to eclogite, a metamorphic rock that forms from ocean floor basalt in the subduction channel. Eclogite dates are rarely reset, and the authors found that eclogite from both sides of the Motagua dates to roughly 130 million years old.

The disparate dating of rocks along the Motagua can be explained by the following scenario: a collision 130 million years ago created a serpentinite belt that was subsequently sliced into segments.

Then, after plate movement changed direction about 100 million years ago, a second collision between one of these slices and the North American plate reset the mica clocks in jadeitite found on the northern side of the fault to 70 million years. Finally, plate motion in the last 70 million years juxtaposed the southern serpentinites with the northern serpentinites, which explains why there are collisional remnants on both sides of the Motagua.

"All serpentinites along the fault line formed at the same time, but the northern assemblage was re-metamorphosed at about 70 million year ago. There are two collision events recorded in the rocks observed today, one event on the southern side and two on the northern," explains author George Harlow, Curator in the Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the American Museum of Natural History. "Motion between plates is usually not a single motion-it is a series of motions.


www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sat, November 28, 2009 - 1:28 AM by offlinerob

Rich Ore Deposits Linked To Ancient Atmosphere


Washington DC (SPX) Nov 27, 2009
Much of our planet's mineral wealth was deposited billions of years ago when Earth's chemical cycles were different from today's. Using geochemical clues from rocks nearly 3 billion years old, a group of scientists including Andrey Bekker and Doug Rumble from the Carnegie Institution have made the surprising discovery that the creation of economically important nickel ore deposits was linked to sulfur in the ancient oxygen-poor atmosphere.
These ancient ores - specifically iron-nickel sulfide deposits - yield 10% of the world's annual nickel production. They formed for the most part between two and three billion years ago when hot magmas erupted on the ocean floor. Yet scientists have puzzled over the origin of the rich deposits. The ore minerals require sulfur to form, but neither seawater nor the magmas hosting the ores were thought to be rich enough in sulfur for this to happen.

"These nickel deposits have sulfur in them arising from an atmospheric cycle in ancient times. The isotopic signal is of an anoxic atmosphere," says Rumble of Carnegie's Geophysical Laboratory, a co-author of the paper appearing in the November 20 issue of Science.

Rumble, with lead author Andrey Bekker (formerly Carnegie Fellow and now at the University of Manitoba), and four other colleagues used advanced geochemical techniques to analyze rock samples from major ore deposits in Australia and Canada. They found that to help produce the ancient deposits, sulfur atoms made a complicated journey from volcanic eruptions, to the atmosphere, to seawater, to hot springs on the ocean floor, and finally to molten, ore-producing magmas.

The key evidence came from a form of sulfur known as sulfur-33, an isotope in which atoms contain one more neutron than "normal" sulfur (sulfur-32). Both isotopes act the same in most chemical reactions, but reactions in the atmosphere in which sulfur dioxide gas molecules are split by ultraviolet light (UV) rays cause the isotopes to be sorted or "fractionated" into different reaction products, creating isotopic anomalies.

"If there is too much oxygen in the atmosphere then not enough UV gets through and these reactions can't happen," says Rumble. "So if you find these sulfur isotope anomalies in rocks of a certain age, you have information about the oxygen level in the atmosphere."

By linking the rich nickel ores with the ancient atmosphere, the anomalies in the rock samples also answer the long-standing question regarding the source of the sulfur in the ore minerals. Knowing this will help geologists track down new ore deposits, says Rumble, because the presence of sulfur and other chemical factors determine whether or not a deposit will form.

"Ore deposits are a tiny fraction of a percent of the Earth's surface, yet economically they are incredibly important.


www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Mon, February 1, 2010 - 11:13 PM by offlinerob

Corvallis OR (SPX) Feb 02, 2010
Researchers have discovered that some of the most fundamental assumptions about how water moves through soil in a seasonally dry climate such as the Pacific Northwest are incorrect - and that a century of research based on those assumptions will have to be reconsidered.
A new study by scientists from Oregon State University and the Environmental Protection Agency showed - much to the surprise of the researchers - that soil clings tenaciously to the first precipitation after a dry summer, and holds it so tightly that it almost never mixes with other water.

The finding is so significant, researchers said, that they aren't even sure yet what it may mean. But it could affect our understanding of how pollutants move through soils, how nutrients get transported from soils to streams, how streams function and even how vegetation might respond to climate change.

The research was just published online in Nature Geoscience, a professional journal.

"Water in mountains such as the Cascade Range of Oregon and Washington basically exists in two separate worlds," said Jeff McDonnell, an OSU distinguished professor and holder of the Richardson Chair in Watershed Science in the OSU College of Forestry. "We used to believe that when new precipitation entered the soil, it mixed well with other water and eventually moved to streams. We just found out that isn't true."

"This could have enormous implications for our understanding of watershed function," he said. "It challenges about 100 years of conventional thinking."

What actually happens, the study showed, is that the small pores around plant roots fill with water that gets held there until it's eventually used up in plant transpiration back to the atmosphere. Then new water becomes available with the return of fall rains, replenishes these small localized reservoirs near the plants and repeats the process. But all the other water moving through larger pores is essentially separate and almost never intermingles with that used by plants during the dry summer.

The study found in one test, for instance, that after the first large rainstorm in October, only 4 percent of the precipitation entering the soil ended up in the stream - 96 percent was taken up and held tightly by soil around plants to recharge soil moisture.

A month later when soil moisture was fully recharged, 55 percent of precipitation went directly into streams. And as winter rains continue to pour moisture into the ground, almost all of the water that originally recharged the soil around plants remains held tightly in the soil - it never moves or mixes.

"This tells us that we have a less complete understanding of how water moves through soils, and is affected by them, than we thought we did," said Renee Brooks, a research plant physiologist with the EPA and courtesy faculty in the OSU Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

"Our mathematical models of ecosystem function are based on certain assumptions about biological processes," Brooks said. "This changes some of those assumptions. Among the implications is that we may have to reconsider how other things move through soils that we are interested in, such as nutrients or pollutants."

The new findings were made possible by advances in the speed and efficiency of stable isotope analyses of water, which allowed scientists to essentially "fingerprint" water and tell where it came from and where it moved to. Never before was it possible to make so many isotopic measurements and get a better view of water origin and movement, the researchers said.

The study also points out the incredible ability of plants to take up water that is so tightly bound to the soil, with forces nothing else in nature can match.
www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Fri, March 5, 2010 - 4:56 PM by offlinerob

Earth's robust magnetic field protects the planet and its inhabitants from the full brunt of the solar wind, a torrent of charged particles that on less shielded planets such as Venus and Mars has over the ages stripped away water reserves and degraded their upper atmospheres. Unraveling the timeline for the emergence of that magnetic field and the mechanism that generates it—a dynamo of convective fluid in Earth's outer core—can help constrain the early history of the planet, including the interplay of geologic, atmospheric and astronomical processes that rendered the world habitable.

An interdisciplinary study published in the March 5 Science attempts to do just that, presenting evidence that Earth had a dynamo-generated magnetic field as early as 3.45 billion years ago, just a billion or so years after the planet had formed. The new research pushes back the record of Earth's magnetic field by at least 200 million years; a related group had presented similar evidence from slightly younger rocks in 2007, arguing for a strong terrestrial magnetic field 3.2 billion years ago.

University of Rochester geophysicist John Tarduno and his colleagues analyzed rocks from the Kaapvaal Craton, a region near the southern tip of Africa that hosts relatively pristine early Archean crust. (The Archean eon began about 3.8 billion years ago and ended 2.5 billion years ago.)

In 2009 Tarduno's group had found that some of the rocks were magnetized 3.45 billion years ago—roughly coinciding with the direct evidence for Earth's first life, at 3.5 billion years ago. But an external source for the magnetism—such as a blast from the solar wind—could not be ruled out. Venus, for instance, which lacks a strong internal magnetic field of its own, does have a feeble external magnetic field induced by the impact of the solar wind into the planet's dense atmosphere.

Magnetic measures
The new study examines the magnetic field strength required to imprint magnetism on the Kaapvaal rocks; it concludes that the field was 50 percent to 70 percent of its present strength. That value is many times greater than would be expected for an external magnetic field, such as the weak Venusian field, supporting the presence of an inner-Earth dynamo at that time.

With the added constraints on the early magnetic field, the researchers were able to extrapolate how well that field could keep the solar wind at bay. The group found that the early Archean magnetopause, the boundary in space where the magnetic field meets the solar wind, was about 30,000 kilometers or less from Earth. The magnetopause is about twice that distance today but can shift in response to extreme energetic outbursts from the sun. "Those steady-state conditions three and a half billion years ago are similar to what we see during severe solar storms today," Tarduno says. With the magnetopause so close to Earth, the planet would not have been totally shielded from the solar wind and may have lost much of its water early on, the researchers say.

Clues for finding habitable exoplanets
As researchers redouble their efforts to find the first truly Earth-like planet outside the solar system, Tarduno says the relationship between stellar wind, atmospheres and magnetic fields should come into play when modeling a planet's potential habitability. "This is clearly a variable to think about when looking at exoplanets," he says, adding that a magnetic field's impact on a planet's water budget seems particularly important.

One scientist in the field agrees that the results are plausible but has some lingering questions. "I think the work that Tarduno and his co-authors are doing is really exciting," says Peter Selkin, a geologist at the University of Washington Tacoma. "There's a lot of potential to use the tools that they've developed to look at rocks that are much older than anybody has been able to do paleomagnetism on before."

But he notes that even the relatively pristine rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton have undergone low-grade mineralogical and temperature changes over billions of years. "They're not exactly in the state they were in initially," Selkin says, "and that's exactly what has made a lot of paleomagnetists stay away from rocks like these." Selkin credits Tarduno and his co-authors for doing all they can to show that the magnetized samples have been minimally altered, but he would like to see more petrologic and mineralogical analysis. "I think that there are still things that we need to know about the minerals that Tarduno and his co-authors used in this study in order to be able to completely buy the results," he says.

David Dunlop, a geophysicist at the University of Toronto, is more convinced, calling the work a "very careful demonstration." The field strengths, he says, "can be assigned quite confidently" to the time interval 3.4 billion to 3.45 billion years ago. "It would be exciting to push back the curtain shadowing [the] onset of the geodynamo still further, but this seems unlikely," Dunlop says. "Nowhere else has nature been so kind in preserving nearly pristine magnetic remanence carriers."
www.scientificamerican.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Tue, March 9, 2010 - 10:13 PM by offlinerob

Geologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a "snowball Earth" event long suspected to have taken place around that time.
Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work this week in the journal Science.

The new findings--based on an analysis of ancient tropical rocks that are now found in remote northwestern Canada--bolster the theory that our planet has, at times in the past, been ice-covered at all latitudes.

"This is the first time that the Sturtian glaciation has been shown to have occurred at tropical latitudes, providing direct evidence that this particular glaciation was a 'snowball Earth' event," says lead author Francis Macdonald, a geologist at Harvard University.

"Our data also suggest that the Sturtian glaciation lasted a minimum of five million years."

According to Enriqueta Barrera, program director in NSF's Division of Earth Sciences, which supported the research, the Sturtian glaciation, along with the Marinoan glaciation right after it, are the greatest ice ages known to have taken place on Earth. "Ice may have covered the entire planet then," says Barrera, "turning it into a 'snowball Earth.'"

The survival of eukaryotes--life forms other than microbes such as bacteria--throughout this period suggests that sunlight and surface water remained available somewhere on Earth's surface. The earliest animals arose at roughly the same time.

Even in a snowball Earth, Macdonald says, there would be temperature gradients, and it is likely that sea ice would be dynamic: flowing, thinning and forming local patches of open water, providing refuge for life.

"The fossil record suggests that all of the major eukaryotic groups, with the possible exception of animals, existed before the Sturtian glaciation," Macdonald says. "The questions that arise from this are: If a snowball Earth existed, how did these eukaryotes survive? Did the Sturtian snowball Earth stimulate evolution and the origin of animals?"

"From an evolutionary perspective," he adds, "it's not always a bad thing for life on Earth to face severe stress."

The rocks Macdonald and his colleagues analyzed in Canada's Yukon Territory showed glacial deposits and other signs of glaciation, such as striated clasts, ice-rafted debris, and deformation of soft sediments.

The scientists were able to determine, based on the magnetism and composition of these rocks, that 716.5 million years ago the rocks were located at sea-level in the tropics, at about 10 degrees latitude.

"Climate modeling has long predicted that if sea ice were ever to develop within 30 degrees latitude of the equator, the whole ocean would rapidly freeze over," Macdonald says. "So our result implies quite strongly that ice would have been found at all latitudes during the Sturtian glaciation."

Scientists don't know exactly what caused this glaciation or what ended it, but Macdonald says its age of 716.5 million years closely matches the age of a large igneous province--made up of rocks formed by magma that has cooled--stretching more than 1,500 kilometers (932 miles) from Alaska to Ellesmere Island in far northeastern Canada.

This coincidence could mean the glaciation was either precipitated or terminated by volcanic activity.


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Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Tue, April 6, 2010 - 9:46 PM by offlinerob

A thousand years after the last ice age ended, the Northern Hemisphere was plunged back into glacial conditions. For 20 years, scientists have blamed a vast flood of meltwater for causing this 'Younger Dryas' cooling, 13,000 years ago. Picking through evidence from Canada's Mackenzie River, geologists now believe they have found traces of this flood, revealing that cold water from North America's dwindling ice sheet poured into the Arctic Ocean, from where it ultimately disrupted climate-warming currents in the Atlantic.

The researchers scoured tumbled boulders and gravel terraces along the Mackenzie River for signs of the meltwater's passage. The flood "would solve a big problem if it actually happened", says oceanographer Wally Broecker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York, who was not part of the team.
the geologists present evidence confirming that the flood occurred (J. B. Murton et al. Nature 464, 740–743; 2010). But their findings raise questions about exactly how the flood chilled the planet. Many researchers thought the water would have poured down what is now the St Lawrence River into the North Atlantic Ocean, where the currents form a sensitive climate trigger. Instead, the Mackenzie River route would have funnelled the flood into the Arctic Ocean .

The Younger Dryas was named after the Arctic wild flower Dryas octopetala that spread across Scandinavia as the big chill set in. At its onset, temperatures in northern Europe suddenly dropped 10 °C or more in decades, and tundra replaced the forest that had been regaining its hold on the land. Broecker suggested in 1989 that the rapid climate shift was caused by a slowdown of surface currents in the Atlantic Ocean, which carry warm water north from the Equator to high latitudes (W. S. Broecker et al. Nature 341, 318-321; 1989). The currents are part of the 'thermohaline' ocean circulation, which is driven as the cold and salty — hence dense — waters of the far North Atlantic sink, drawing warmer surface waters north.

Broecker proposed that the circulation was disrupted by a surge of fresh water that overflowed from Lake Agassiz, a vast meltwater reservoir that had accumulated behind the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet in the area of today's Great Lakes. The fresh water would have reduced the salinity of the surface waters, stopping them from sinking.

“There's no way for that water to go out of the Arctic without going into the Atlantic.”


The theory is widely accepted. However, scientists never found geological evidence of the assumed flood pathway down the St Lawrence River into the North Atlantic; or along a possible alternative route southwards through the Mississippi basin. Now it is clear why: the flood did occur; it just took a different route.

The team, led by Julian Murton of the University of Sussex in Brighton, UK, dated sand, gravel and boulders from eroded surfaces in the Athabasca Valley and the Mackenzie River delta in northwestern Canada. The shapes of the geological features there suggest that the region had two major glacial outburst floods, the first of which coincides with the onset of the Younger Dryas. If the western margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet lay just slightly east of their assumed location, several thousand cubic kilometres of water would have been able to flood into the Arctic Ocean.



"Geomorphic observations and chronology clearly indicate a northwestern flood route down the Mackenzie valley," says James Teller, a geologist at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, who took part in the study. But he thinks that the route raises questions about the climatic effects of the Lake Agassiz spill. "We're pretty sure that the water, had it flooded the northern Atlantic, would have been capable of slowing the thermohaline ocean circulation and produce the Younger Dryas cooling," he says. "The question is whether it could have done the same in the Arctic Ocean."

Broecker, however, says that the Arctic flood is just what his theory needed. He says that flood waters heading down the St Lawrence River might not have affected the thermohaline circulation anyway, because the sinking takes place far to the north, near Greenland. A pulse of fresh water into the Arctic, however, would ultimately have flowed into the North Atlantic and pulled the climate trigger there. "There's no way for that water to go out of the Arctic without going into the Atlantic," he says.
www.nature.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sat, April 10, 2010 - 6:30 PM by offlinerob

Santa Barbara, Calif. (UPI) Apr 6, 2010
A U.S. geologist says she's discovered a pattern that connects regular changes in the Earth's orbital cycle to changes in the planet's climate.
University of California-Santa Barbara Assistant Professor Lorraine Lisiecki performed her analysis of climate by examining ocean sediment cores taken from 57 locations around the world and linking that climate record to the history of the Earth's orbit.

The researchers said it's known the Earth's orbit around the sun changes shape every 100,000 years, becoming either more round or more elliptical. The shape of the orbit is known as its "eccentricity" and a related aspect is the 41,000-year cycle in the tilt of the Earth's axis.

Glaciation of the Earth also occurs every 100,000 years and Lisiecki found the timing of changes in climate and eccentricity coincided.

"The clear correlation between the timing of the change in orbit and the change in the Earth's climate is strong evidence of a link between the two," Lisiecki said. She also said she discovered the largest glacial cycles occurred during the weakest changes in the eccentricity of Earth's orbit -- and vice versa, with the stronger changes in orbit correlating to weaker changes in climate.

"This may mean that the Earth's climate has internal instability in addition to sensitivity to changes in the orbit," she said.

The research is reported in the journal Nature Geoscience.
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Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sun, August 15, 2010 - 3:25 AM by offlinerob

An international team of scientists including Mark Williams and Jan Zalasiewicz of the Geology Department of the University of Leicester, and led by Dr. Thijs Vandenbroucke, formerly of Leicester and now at the University of Lille 1 (France), has reconstructed the Earth's climate belts of the late Ordovician Period, between 460 and 445 million years ago.



The findings have been published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences -- and show that these ancient climate belts were surprisingly like those of the present.

The researchers state: "The world of the ancient past had been thought by scientists to differ from ours in many respects, including having carbon dioxide levels much higher -- over twenty times as high -- than those of the present. However, it is very hard to deduce carbon dioxide levels with any accuracy from such ancient rocks, and it was known that there was a paradox, for the late Ordovician was known to include a brief, intense glaciation -- something difficult to envisage in a world with high levels of greenhouse gases. "

The team of scientists looked at the global distribution of common, but mysterious fossils called chitinozoans -- probably the egg-cases of extinct planktonic animals -- before and during this Ordovician glaciation. They found a pattern that revealed the position of ancient climate belts, including such features as the polar front, which separates cold polar waters from more temperate ones at lower latitudes. The position of these climate belts changed as the Earth entered the Ordovician glaciation -- but in a pattern very similar to that which happened in oceans much more recently, as they adjusted to the glacial and interglacial phases of our current (and ongoing) Ice Age.

This 'modern-looking' pattern suggests that those ancient carbon dioxide levels could not have been as high as previously thought, but were more modest, at about five times current levels (they would have had to be somewhat higher than today's, because the sun in those far-off times shone less brightly).

"These ancient, but modern-looking oceans emphasise the stability of Earth's atmosphere and climate through deep time -- and show the current man-made rise in greenhouse gas levels to be an even more striking phenomenon than was thought," the researchers conclude.

www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Thu, August 19, 2010 - 5:55 AM by offlinerob

Aug 19, 2010
Scientists have discovered a new window into the Earth's violent past. Geochemical evidence from volcanic rocks collected on Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic suggests that beneath it lies a region of the Earth's mantle that has largely escaped the billions of years of melting and geological churning that has affected the rest of the planet.
Researchers believe the discovery offers clues to the early chemical evolution of the Earth.

The newly identified mantle "reservoir," as it is called, dates from just a few tens of million years after the Earth was first assembled from the collisions of smaller bodies. This reservoir likely represents the composition of the mantle shortly after formation of the core, but before the 4.5 billion years of crust formation and recycling modified the composition of most of the rest of Earth's interior.

"This was a key phase in the evolution of the Earth," says co-author Richard Carlson of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. "It set the stage for everything that came after. Primitive mantle such as that we have identified would have been the ultimate source of all the magmas and all the different rock types we see on Earth today."

Carlson and lead author Matthew Jackson (a former Carnegie postdoctoral fellow, now at Boston University), with colleagues, using samples collected by coauthor Don Francis of McGill University, targeted the Baffin Island rocks, which are the earliest expression of the mantle hotspot now feeding volcanic eruptions on Iceland, because previous study of helium isotopes in these rocks showed them to have anomalously high ratios of helium-3 to helium-4.

Helium-3 is generally extremely rare within the Earth; most of the mantle's supply has been outgassed by volcanic eruptions and lost to space over the planet's long geological history. In contrast, helium-4 has been constantly replenished within the Earth by the decay of radioactive uranium and thorium.

The high proportion of helium-3 suggests that the Baffin Island lavas came from a reservoir in the mantle that had never previously outgassed its original helium-3, implying that it had not been subjected to the extensive chemical differentiation experienced by most of the mantle.

The researchers confirmed this conclusion by analyzing the lead isotopes in the lava samples, which date the reservoir to between 4.55 and 4.45 billion years old. This age is only slightly younger than the Earth itself.

The early age of the mantle reservoir implies that it existed before melting of the mantle began to create the magmas that rose to form Earth's crust and before plate tectonics allowed that crust to be mixed back into the mantle.

Many researchers have assumed that before continental crust formed the mantle's chemistry was similar to that of meteorites called chondrites, but that the formation of continents altered its chemistry, causing it to become depleted in the elements, called incompatible elements, that are extracted with the magma when melting occurs in the mantle.

"Our results question this assumption," says Carlson. "They suggest that before continent extraction, the mantle already was depleted in incompatible elements compared to chondrites, perhaps because of an even earlier Earth differentiation event, or perhaps because the Earth originally formed from building blocks depleted in these elements."

Of the two possibilities, Carlson favors the early differentiation model, which would involve a global magma ocean on the newly-formed Earth. This magma ocean produced a crust that predated the crust that exists today.

"In our model, the original crust that formed by the solidification of the magma ocean was buoyantly unstable at Earth's surface because it was rich in iron," he says. "This instability caused it to sink to the base of the mantle, taking the incompatible elements with it, where it remains today."

Some of this deep material may have remained liquid despite the high pressures, and Carlson points out that seismological studies of the deep mantle reveal certain areas, one beneath the southern Pacific and another beneath Africa, that appear to be molten and possibly chemically different from the rest of the mantle.

"I'm holding out hope that these seismically imaged areas might be the compositional complement to the "depleted" primitive mantle that we sample in the Baffin Island lavas," he says
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Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Thu, September 2, 2010 - 1:07 AM by offlinerob

Computational scientists and geophysicists at the University of Texas at Austin and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed new computer algorithms that for the first time allow for the simultaneous modeling of the earth's Earth's mantle flow, large-scale tectonic plate motions, and the behavior of individual fault zones, to produce an unprecedented view of plate tectonics and the forces that drive it.
A paper describing the whole-earth model and its underlying algorithms will be published in the August 27 issue of the journal Science and also featured on the cover.

The work "illustrates the interplay between making important advances in science and pushing the envelope of computational science," says Michael Gurnis, the John E. and Hazel S. Smits Professor of Geophysics, director of the Caltech Seismological Laboratory, and a coauthor of the Science paper.

To create the new model, computational scientists at Texas's Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES)-a team that included Omar Ghattas, the John A. and Katherine G. Jackson Chair in Computational Geosciences and professor of geological sciences and mechanical engineering, and research associates Georg Stadler and Carsten Burstedde-pushed the envelope of a computational technique known as Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR).

Partial differential equations such as those describing mantle flow are solved by subdividing the region of interest (such as the mantle) into a computational grid. Ordinarily, the resolution is kept the same throughout the grid. However, many problems feature small-scale dynamics that are found only in limited regions.

"AMR methods adaptively create finer resolution only where it's needed," explains Ghattas. "This leads to huge reductions in the number of grid points, making possible simulations that were previously out of reach."

"The complexity of managing adaptivity among thousands of processors, however, has meant that current AMR algorithms have not scaled well on modern petascale supercomputers," he adds. Petascale computers are capable of one million billion operations per second. To overcome this long-standing problem, the group developed new algorithms that, Burstedde says, "allows for adaptivity in a way that scales to the hundreds of thousands of processor cores of the largest supercomputers available today."

With the new algorithms, the scientists were able to simulate global mantle flow and how it manifests as plate tectonics and the motion of individual faults. According to Stadler, the AMR algorithms reduced the size of the simulations by a factor of 5,000, permitting them to fit on fewer than 10,000 processors and run overnight on the Ranger supercomputer at the National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported Texas Advanced Computing Center.

A key to the model was the incorporation of data on a multitude of scales. "Many natural processes display a multitude of phenomena on a wide range of scales, from small to large," Gurnis explains.

For example, at the largest scale-that of the whole earth-the movement of the surface tectonic plates is a manifestation of a giant heat engine, driven by the convection of the mantle below. The boundaries between the plates, however, are composed of many hundreds to thousands of individual faults, which together constitute active fault zones.

"The individual fault zones play a critical role in how the whole planet works," he says, "and if you can't simulate the fault zones, you can't simulate plate movement"-and, in turn, you can't simulate the dynamics of the whole planet.

In the new model, the researchers were able to resolve the largest fault zones, creating a mesh with a resolution of about one kilometer near the plate boundaries.

Included in the simulation were seismological data as well as data pertaining to the temperature of the rocks, their density, and their viscosity-or how strong or weak the rocks are, which affects how easily they deform. That deformation is nonlinear-with simple changes producing unexpected and complex effects.

"Normally, when you hit a baseball with a bat, the properties of the bat don't change-it won't turn to Silly Putty. In the earth, the properties do change, which creates an exciting computational problem," says Gurnis. "If the system is too nonlinear, the earth becomes too mushy; if it's not nonlinear enough, plates won't move. We need to hit the 'sweet spot.'"

After crunching through the data for 100,000 hours of processing time per run, the model returned an estimate of the motion of both large tectonic plates and smaller microplates-including their speed and direction. The results were remarkably close to observed plate movements.

In fact, the investigators discovered that anomalous rapid motion of microplates emerged from the global simulations. "In the western Pacific," Gurnis says, "we have some of the most rapid tectonic motions seen anywhere on Earth, in a process called 'trench rollback.' For the first time, we found that these small-scale tectonic motions emerged from the global models, opening a new frontier in geophysics."

One surprising result from the model relates to the energy released from plates in earthquake zones. "It had been thought that the majority of energy associated with plate tectonics is released when plates bend, but it turns out that's much less important than previously thought," Gurnis says.

"Instead, we found that much of the energy dissipation occurs in the earth's deep interior. We never saw this when we looked on smaller scales."


www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Sun, September 19, 2010 - 5:40 AM by offlinerob

ScienceDaily (Sep. 17, 2010) — Earth's mantle and its core mix at a distance of 2900 kilometers under our feet in a mysterious zone. A team of geophysicists has just verified that the partial fusion of the mantle is possible in this area when the temperature reaches 4200 Kelvin. This reinforces the hypothesis of the presence of a deep magma ocean.


The originality of this work, carried out by the scientists of the Institut de minéralogie et de physique des milieux condensés (UPMC/Université Paris Diderot/Institut de Physique du Globe/CNRS/IRD), lies in the use of X-ray diffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France). The results will have an effect in the understanding of the dynamics, composition and the formation of the depths of our planet.

On top of Earth's core, consisting of liquid iron, lies the solid mantle, which is made up essentially of magnesium oxides, iron and silicon. The border between the core and the mantle, located at 2900 km below Earth's surface, is highly intriguing to geophysicists. With a pressure of around 1.4 million times the atmospheric pressure and a temperature of more than 4000 Kelvin, this zone is home to chemical reactions and changes in states of matter still unknown. The seismologists who have studied this subject have acknowledged an abrupt reduction of the speed of the seismic waves, which sometimes reach 30% when getting close to this border. This fact has led scientists to formulate the hypothesis, for the last 15 years, of the partial melting of the Earth mantle at the level of this mantle-core border. Today, this hypothesis has been confirmed.

In order to access the depths of our planet, scientists have not only seismological images but also a precious experimental technique: diamond anvil cells, coupled with a heating layer. This instrument allows scientists to re-create the same pressure and temperature conditions as those in Earth's interior on samples of a few microns. This is the technique used by the researchers of the Institut de minéralogie et de physique des milieux condensés on natural samples that are representatives of Earth's mantle and that have been put under pressures of more than 140 gigapascals (or 1.4 million times the atmospheric pressure), and temperatures of more than 5000 Kelvin.

A new approach to this study has been the use of the X-ray diffraction technique at the European synchrotron (ESRF). This has allowed the scientists to determine what mineral phases melt first, and they have also established, without extrapolation, fusion curves of the deep Earth mantle -- i.e., the characterization of the passage from a solid state to a partially liquid state. Their observations show that the partial fusion of the mantle is possible when the temperature approaches 4200 Kelvin. These experiments also prove that the liquid produced during this partial fusion is dense and that it can hold multiple chemical elements, among which are important markers of the dynamics of Earth's mantle. These studies will allow geophysicists and geochemists to achieve a deeper knowledge of the mechanisms of differentiation of Earth and the history of its formation, which started around 4.5 billion years ago.
www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Tue, December 7, 2010 - 3:38 AM by offlinerob

Seattle WA (SPX) Dec 06, 2010
For years, geologists have argued about the processes that formed steep inner gorges in the broad glacial valleys of the Swiss Alps.
The U-shaped valleys were created by slow-moving glaciers that behaved something like road graders, eroding the bedrock over hundreds or thousands of years. When the glaciers receded, rivers carved V-shaped notches, or inner gorges, into the floors of the glacial valleys. But scientists disagreed about whether those notches were erased by subsequent glaciers and then formed all over again as the second round of glaciers receded.

New research led by a University of Washington scientist indicates that the notches endure, at least in part, from one glacial episode to the next. The glaciers appear to fill the gorges with ice and rock, protecting them from being scoured away as the glaciers move.

When the glaciers receded, the resulting rivers returned to the gorges and easily cleared out the debris deposited there, said David Montgomery, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences.

"The alpine inner gorges appear to lay low and endure glacial attack. They are topographic survivors," Montgomery said.

"The answer is not so simple that the glaciers always win. The river valleys can hide under the glaciers and when the glaciers melt the rivers can go back to work."

Montgomery is lead author of a paper describing the research, published online Dec. 5 in Nature Geoscience. Co-author is Oliver Korup of the University of Potsdam in Germany, who did the work while with the Swiss Federal Research Institutes in Davos, Switzerland.

The researchers used topographic data taken from laser-based (LIDAR) measurements to determine that, if the gorges were erased with each glacial episode, the rivers would have had to erode the bedrock from one-third to three-quarters of an inch per year since the last glacial period to get gorges as deep as they are today.

"That is screamingly fast. It's really too fast for the processes," Montgomery said. Such erosion rates would exceed those in all areas of the world except the most tectonically active regions, the researchers said, and they would have to maintain those rates for 1,000 years.

Montgomery and Korup found other telltale evidence, sediment from much higher elevations and older than the last glacial deposits, at the bottom of the river gorges. That material likely was pushed into the gorges as glaciers moved down the valleys, indicating the gorges formed before the last glaciers.

"That means the glaciers aren't cutting down the bedrock as fast as the rivers do. If the glaciers were keeping up, each time they'd be able to erase the notch left by the river," Montgomery said.

"They're locked in this dance, working together to tear the mountains down."

The work raises questions about how common the preservation of gorges might be in other mountainous regions of the world.

"It shows that inner gorges can persist, and so the question is, 'How typical is that?' I don't think every inner gorge in the world survives multiple glaciations like that, but the Swiss Alps are a classic case. That's where mountain glaciation was first discovered."

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Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

^Rhino! Tue, December 7, 2010 - 6:59 AM by

I find this article as symptomatic that LIDAR has found yet ANOTHER use. A very useful too, really. The USGS office in Rolla, Missouri has several specialists who have provided LIDAR expertise on occasion that is targeted on various ends, mainly answering questions of topographic veracity at scale.

But it's so much more.

It can be used to define slope so well, and define individual block sizes and shapes, that men need no longer go up and down on ropes to make the measurements to determine rockfall likelihood, bounce heights and velocities in the Colorado Rockfall Simulation Program, and even monitor changes in slope configuration.

I've seen it used for the mapping of underground mines.

Thanks for posting. Overall, a good article.


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Mon, December 20, 2010 - 5:05 PM by offlinerob

Berkeley CA (SPX) Dec 20, 2010
A University of California, Berkeley, geophysicist has made the first-ever measurement of the strength of the magnetic field inside Earth's core, 1,800 miles underground.
The magnetic field strength is 25 Gauss, or 50 times stronger than the magnetic field at the surface that makes compass needles align north-south. Though this number is in the middle of the range geophysicists predict, it puts constraints on the identity of the heat sources in the core that keep the internal dynamo running to maintain this magnetic field.

"This is the first really good number we've had based on observations, not inference," said author Bruce A. Buffett, professor of earth and planetary science at UC Berkeley. "The result is not controversial, but it does rule out a very weak magnetic field and argues against a very strong field."

A strong magnetic field inside the outer core means there is a lot of convection and thus a lot of heat being produced, which scientists would need to account for, Buffett said. The presumed sources of energy are the residual heat from 4 billion years ago when the planet was hot and molten, release of gravitational energy as heavy elements sink to the bottom of the liquid core, and radioactive decay of long-lived elements such as potassium, uranium and thorium.

A weak field - 5 Gauss, for example - would imply that little heat is being supplied by radioactive decay, while a strong field, on the order of 100 Gauss, would imply a large contribution from radioactive decay.

"A measurement of the magnetic field tells us what the energy requirements are and what the sources of heat are," Buffett said.

About 60 percent of the power generated inside the earth likely comes from the exclusion of light elements from the solid inner core as it freezes and grows, he said. This constantly builds up crud in the outer core.

The Earth's magnetic field is produced in the outer two-thirds of the planet's iron/nickel core. This outer core, about 1,400 miles thick, is liquid, while the inner core is a frozen iron and nickel wrecking ball with a radius of about 800 miles - roughly the size of the moon. The core is surrounded by a hot, gooey mantle and a rigid surface crust.

The cooling Earth originally captured its magnetic field from the planetary disk in which the solar system formed. That field would have disappeared within 10,000 years if not for the planet's internal dynamo, which regenerates the field thanks to heat produced inside the planet. The heat makes the liquid outer core boil, or "convect," and as the conducting metals rise and then sink through the existing magnetic field, they create electrical currents that maintain the magnetic field. This roiling dynamo produces a slowly shifting magnetic field at the surface.

"You get changes in the surface magnetic field that look a lot like gyres and flows in the oceans and the atmosphere, but these are being driven by fluid flow in the outer core," Buffett said.

Buffett is a theoretician who uses observations to improve computer models of the earth's internal dynamo. Now at work on a second generation model, he admits that a lack of information about conditions in the earth's interior has been a big hindrance to making accurate models.

He realized, however, that the tug of the moon on the tilt of the earth's spin axis could provide information about the magnetic field inside. This tug would make the inner core precess - that is, make the spin axis slowly rotate in the opposite direction - which would produce magnetic changes in the outer core that damp the precession. Radio observations of distant quasars - extremely bright, active galaxies - provide very precise measurements of the changes in the earth's rotation axis needed to calculate this damping.

"The moon is continually forcing the rotation axis of the core to precess, and we're looking at the response of the fluid outer core to the precession of the inner core," he said.

By calculating the effect of the moon on the spinning inner core, Buffett discovered that the precession makes the slightly out-of-round inner core generate shear waves in the liquid outer core. These waves of molten iron and nickel move within a tight cone only 30 to 40 meters thick, interacting with the magnetic field to produce an electric current that heats the liquid. This serves to damp the precession of the rotation axis. The damping causes the precession to lag behind the moon as it orbits the earth. A measurement of the lag allowed Buffett to calculate the magnitude of the damping and thus of the magnetic field inside the outer core.

Buffett noted that the calculated field - 25 Gauss - is an average over the entire outer core. The field is expected to vary with position.

"I still find it remarkable that we can look to distant quasars to get insights into the deep interior of our planet," Buffett said.


www.terradaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2 /

rob Wed, December 22, 2010 - 4:53 PM by offlinerob

Palo Alto CA (SPX) Dec 20, 2010
To answer the big questions, it often helps to look at the smallest details. That is the approach Stanford mineral physicist Wendy Mao is taking to understanding a major event in Earth's inner history.
Using a new technique to scrutinize how minute amounts of iron and silicate minerals interact at ultra-high pressures and temperatures, she is gaining insight into the biggest transformation Earth has ever undergone - the separation of its rocky mantle from its iron-rich core approximately 4.5 billion years ago.

The technique, called high-pressure nanoscale X-ray computed tomography, is being developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. With it, Mao is getting unprecedented detail - in three-dimensional images - of changes in the texture and shape of molten iron and solid silicate minerals as they respond to the same intense pressures and temperatures found deep in the Earth.

Mao will present the results of the first few experiments with the technique at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

Tomography refers to the process that creates a three-dimensional image by combining a series of two-dimensional images, or cross-sections, through an object. A computer program interpolates between the images to flesh out a recreation of the object.

Through experiments at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource and Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source, researchers have developed a way to combine a diamond anvil cell, which compresses tiny samples between the tips of two diamonds, with nanoscale X-ray computed tomography to capture images of material at high pressure.

The pressures deep in the Earth are so high - millions of times atmospheric pressure - that only diamonds can exert the needed pressure without breaking under the force.

At present, the SLAC researchers and their collaborators from HPSync, the High Pressure Synergetic Consortium at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source are the only group using this technique.

"It is pretty exciting, being able to measure the interactions of iron and silicate materials at very high pressures and temperatures, which you could not do before," said Mao, an assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences and of photon science.

"No one has ever imaged these sorts of changes at these very high pressures."

It is generally agreed that the initially homogenous ball of material that was the very early Earth had to be very hot in order to differentiate into the layered sphere we live on today. Since the crust and the layer underneath it, the mantle, are silicate-rich, rocky layers, while the core is iron-rich, it's clear that silicate and iron went in different directions at some point.

But how they separated out and squeezed past each other is not clear. Silicate minerals, which contain silica, make up about 90 percent of the crust of the Earth.

If the planet got hot enough to melt both elements, it would have been easy enough for the difference in density to send iron to the bottom and silicates to the top.

If the temperature was not hot enough to melt silicates, it has been proposed that molten iron might have been able to move along the boundaries between grains of the solid silicate minerals.

"To prove that, though, you need to know whether the molten iron would tend to form small spheres or whether it would form channels," Mao said. "That would depend on the surface energy between the iron and silicate."

Previous experimental work has shown that at low pressure, iron forms isolated spheres, similar to the way water beads up on a waxed surface, Mao said, and spheres could not percolate through solid silicate material.

Mao said the results of her first high-pressure experiments using the tomography apparatus suggest that at high pressure, since the silicate transforms into a different structure, the interaction between the iron and silicate could be different than at low pressure.

"At high pressure, the iron takes a more elongate, platelet-like form," she said. That means the iron would spread out on the surface of the silicate minerals, connecting to form channels instead of remaining in isolated spheres.

"So it looks like you could get some percolation of iron at high pressure," Mao said. "If iron could do that, that would tell you something really significant about the thermal history of the Earth."

But she cautioned that she only has data from the initial experiments.

"We have some interesting results, but it is the kind of measurement that you need to repeat a couple times to make sure," Mao said.


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Re: Geology Rocks! 2 / New Model for How Nevada Gold Deposits Formed May Help in Gold Exploration

rob Sun, February 6, 2011 - 3:42 PM by offlinerob

A team of University of Nevada, Reno and University of Nevada, Las Vegas researchers have devised a new model for how Nevada's gold deposits formed, which may help in exploration efforts for new gold deposits.

The deposits, known as Carlin-type gold deposits, are characterized by extremely fine-grained nanometer-sized particles of gold adhered to pyrite over large areas that can extend to great depths. More gold has been mined from Carlin-type deposits in Nevada in the last 50 years - more than $200 billion worth at today's gold prices - than was ever mined from during the California gold rush of the 1800s.

This current Nevada gold boom started in 1961 with the discovery of the Carlin gold mine, near the town of Carlin, at a spot where the early westward-moving prospectors missed the gold because it was too fine-grained to be readily seen. Since the 1960s, geologists have found clusters of these "Carlin-type" deposits throughout northern Nevada. They constitute, after South Africa, the second largest concentration of gold on Earth. Despite their importance, geologists have argued for decades about how they formed.

"Carlin-type deposits are unique to Nevada in that they represent a perfect storm of Nevada's ideal geology - a tectonic trigger and magmatic processes, resulting in extremely efficient transport and deposition of gold," said John Muntean, a research economic geologist with the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology at the University of Nevada, Reno and previously an industry geologist who explored for gold in Nevada for many years.

"Understanding how these deposits formed is important because most of the deposits that cropped out at the surface have likely been found. Exploration is increasingly targeting deeper deposits. Such risky deep exploration requires expensive drilling.

"Our model for the formation of Carlin-type deposits may not directly result in new discoveries, but models for gold deposit formation play an important role in how companies explore by mitigating risk. Knowing how certain types of gold deposits form allows one to be more predictive by evaluating whether ore-forming processes operated in the right geologic settings. This could lead to identification of potential new areas of discovery."

Muntean collaborated with researchers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas: Jean Cline, a facultyprofessor of geology at UNLV and a leading authority on Carlin-type gold deposits; Adam Simon, an assistant professor of geoscience who provided new experimental data and his expertise on the interplay between magmas and ore deposits; and Tony Longo, a post-doctoral fellow who carried out detailed microanalyses of the ore minerals.

The team combined decades of previous studies by research and industry geologists with new data of their own to reach their conclusions, which were written about in the Jan. 23 early online issue of Nature Geoscience magazine and will appear in the February printed edition. The team relates formation of the gold deposits to a change in plate tectonics and a major magma event about 40 million years ago. It is the most complete explanation for Carlin-type gold deposits to date.

"Our model won't be the final word on Carlin-type deposits," Muntean said. "We hope it spurs new research in Nevada, especially by people who may not necessarily be ore deposit geologists."

The work was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the United States Geological Survey, Placer Dome Exploration and Barrick Gold Corporation.

www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! 2Caves and their dripstones tell us about the uplift of mountains

rob Wed, May 4, 2011 - 4:02 AM by offlinerob

In one of his songs Bob Dylan asks "How many years can a mountain exist before it is washed to the sea?", and thus poses an intriguing geological question for which an accurate answer is not easily provided. Mountain ranges are in a constant interplay between climatically controlled weathering processes on the one hand and the tectonic forces that cause folding and thrusting and thus thickening of the Earth's crust on the other hand.
While erosion eventually erases any geological obstacles, tectonic forces are responsible for piling- and lifting-up rocks and thus for forming spectacular mountain landscapes such as the European Alps.

In reality, climate, weathering and mountain uplift interact in a complex manner and quantifying rates for erosion and uplift, especially for the last couple of millions of years, remains a challenging task.

In a recent Geology paper Michael Meyer (University of Innsbruck) et al. report on ancient cave systems discovered near the summits of the Allgau Mountains (Austria) that preserved the oldest radiometrically dated dripstones currently known from the European Alps.

"These cave deposits formed ca. 2 million years ago and their geochemical signature and biological inclusions are vastly different from other cave calcites in the Alps" says Meyer, who works at the Institute of Geology and Paleontology at the University of Innsbruck, Austria.

By carefully analysing these dripstones and using an isotopic modelling approach the authors were able to back-calculate both, the depth of the cave and the altitude of the corresponding summit area at the time of calcite formation. Meyer et al. thus derived erosion and uplift rates for the northern rim of the Alps and - most critically - for a geological time period that is characterized by reoccurring ice ages and hence by intensive glacial erosion.

"Our results suggest that 2 million years ago the cave was situated ~1500 meters below its present altitude and the mountains were probably up to 500 meters lower compared to today", states Meyer. These altitudinal changes were significant and much of this uplift can probably be attributed to the gradual unloading of the Alps due to glacial erosion.

Dripstones have been used to reconstruct past climate and environmental change in a variety of ways. The study of Meyer et al. is novel, however, as it highlights the potential of caves and their deposits to quantitatively constrain mountain evolution on a timescale of millions of years and further shows how the interplay of tectonic and climatic processes can be understood. Key to success is an accurate age control provided by Uranium-Lead dating.

This method is commonly used to constrain the age of much older rocks and minerals but has only rarely be applied to dripstones - i.e. only those with high Uranium concentrations - and luckily this is the case for the samples from the Allgau Mountains.


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Re: Geology Rocks! Human influence comes of age

rob Thu, May 12, 2011 - 4:05 AM by offlinerob

Geologists debate epoch to mark effects of Homo sapiens.


Humanity's profound impact on this planet is hard to deny, but is it big enough to merit its own geological epoch? This is the question facing geoscientists gathered in London this week to debate the validity and definition of the 'Anthropocene', a proposed new epoch characterized by human effects on the geological record.

"We are in the process of formalizing it," says Michael Ellis, head of the climate-change programme of the British Geological Survey in Nottingham, who coordinated the 11 May meeting. He and others hope that adopting the term will shift the thinking of policy-makers. "It should remind them of the global and significant impact that humans have," says Ellis.

But not everyone is behind the idea. "Some think it premature, perhaps hubristic, perhaps nonsensical," says Jan Zalasiewicz, a stratigrapher at the University of Leicester, UK, and a co-convener of the meeting. Zalasiewicz, who declares himself "officially very firmly sitting on the fence", also chairs a working group investigating the proposal for the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) — the body that oversees designations of geological time.

The term Anthropocene was first coined in 2000 by Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen, now at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, and his colleagues. It then began appearing in peer-reviewed papers as if it were a technical term rather than scientific slang.



Click for larger imageThe "evidence for the prosecution", as Zalasiewicz puts it, is compelling. Through food production and urbanization, humans have altered more than half of the planet's ice-free land mass1 (see 'Transformation of the biosphere'), and are moving as much as an order of magnitude more rock and soil around than are natural processes2. Rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are expected to make the ocean 0.3–0.4 pH points more acidic by the end of this century. That will dissolve light-coloured carbonate shells and sea-floor rocks for about 1,000 years, leaving a dark band in the sea-floor sediment that will be obvious to future geologists. A similar dark stripe identifies the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum about 55 million years ago, when global temperatures rose by some 6 °C in 20,000 years. A similar temperature jump could happen by 2100, according to some high-emissions scenarios3.

The fossil record will show upheavals too. Some 20% of species living in large areas are now invasive, says Zalasiewicz. "Globally that's a completely novel change." And a review published in Nature in March4 concluded that the disappearance of the species now listed as 'critically endangered' would qualify as a mass extinction on a level seen only five times in the past 540 million years — and all of those mark transitions between geological time periods.

Some at the ICS are wary of formalizing a new epoch. "My main concern is that those who promote it have not given it the careful scientific consideration and evaluation it needs," says Stan Finney, chair of the ICS and a geologist at California State University in Long Beach. He eschews the notion of focusing on the term simply to "generate publicity".

Others point out that an epoch typically lasts tens of millions of years. Our current epoch, the Holocene, began only 11,700 years ago. Declaring the start of a new epoch would compress the geological timeline to what some say is a ridiculous extent. Advocates of the Anthropocene, however, say that it is natural to divide recent history into smaller, more detailed chunks. A less controversial alternative would be to declare the Anthropocene a new 'age': a subdivision of an epoch.


If scientists can agree in principle that a new time division is justified, they will have to settle on a geological marker for its start. Some suggest the pollen of cultivated plants, arguing that mankind's fingerprint can be seen 5,000–10,000 years ago with the beginnings of agriculture. Others support the rise in the levels of greenhouse gases and air pollution in the latter part of the eighteenth century, as industrialization began. A third group would start with the flicker of radioactive isotopes in 1945, marking the invention of nuclear weapons.

Should the working group decide that the Anthropocene epoch has merit, it will go to an ICS vote. But the whole process will take time — defining other geological periods has sometimes taken decades. In the meantime, Zalasiewicz says, "the formalization is the excuse to try to do some very interesting science", comparing Earth's current changes to those of the past.

www.nature.com


Re: Geology Rocks! Core of the Earth melts and freezes

rob Tue, May 24, 2011 - 3:43 AM by offlinerob

Leeds UK (SPX) May 23, 2011
The inner core of the Earth is simultaneously melting and freezing due to circulation of heat in the overlying rocky mantle, according to new research from the University of Leeds, UC San Diego and the Indian Institute of Technology.
The findings, published tomorrow in Nature, could help us understand how the inner core formed and how the outer core acts as a 'geodynamo', which generates the planet's magnetic field.

"The origins of Earth's magnetic field remain a mystery to scientists," said study co-author Dr Jon Mound from the University of Leeds. "We can't go and collect samples from the centre of the Earth, so we have to rely on surface measurements and computer models to tell us what's happening in the core."

"Our new model provides a fairly simple explanation to some of the measurements that have puzzled scientists for years. It suggests that the whole dynamics of the Earth's core are in some way linked to plate tectonics, which isn't at all obvious from surface observations.

"If our model is verified it's a big step towards understanding how the inner core formed, which in turn helps us understand how the core generates the Earth's magnetic field."

The Earth's inner core is a ball of solid iron about the size of our moon. This ball is surrounded by a highly dynamic outer core of a liquid iron-nickel alloy (and some other, lighter elements), a highly viscous mantle and a solid crust that forms the surface where we live.

Over billions of years, the Earth has cooled from the inside out causing the molten iron core to partly freeze and solidify. The inner core has subsequently been growing at the rate of around 1mm a year as iron crystals freeze and form a solid mass.

The heat given off as the core cools flows from the core to the mantle to the Earth's crust through a process known as convection. Like a pan of water boiling on a stove, convection currents move warm mantle to the surface and send cool mantle back to the core. This escaping heat powers the geodynamo and coupled with the spinning of the Earth generates the magnetic field.

Scientists have recently begun to realise that the inner core may be melting as well as freezing, but there has been much debate about how this is possible when overall the deep Earth is cooling. Now the research team believes they have solved the mystery.

Using a computer model of convection in the outer core, together with seismology data, they show that heat flow at the core-mantle boundary varies depending on the structure of the overlying mantle. In some regions, this variation is large enough to force heat from the mantle back into the core, causing localised melting.

The model shows that beneath the seismically active regions around the Pacific 'Ring of Fire', where tectonic plates are undergoing subduction, the cold remnants of oceanic plates at the bottom of the mantle draw a lot of heat from the core. This extra mantle cooling generates down-streams of cold material that cross the outer core and freeze onto the inner core.

Conversely, in two large regions under Africa and the Pacific where the lowermost mantle is hotter than average, less heat flows out from the core. The outer core below these regions can become warm enough that it will start melting back the solid inner core.

Co-author Dr Binod Sreenivasan from the Indian Institute of Technology said: "If Earth's inner core is melting in places, it can make the dynamics near the inner core-outer core boundary more complex than previously thought.

"On the one hand, we have blobs of light material being constantly released from the boundary where pure iron crystallizes. On the other hand, melting would produce a layer of dense liquid above the boundary. Therefore, the blobs of light elements will rise through this layer before they stir the overlying outer core.

"Interestingly, not all dynamo models produce heat going into the inner core. So the possibility of inner core melting can also place a powerful constraint on the regime in which the Earth's dynamo operates."

Co-author Dr Sebastian Rost from the University of Leeds added: "The standard view has been that the inner core is freezing all over and growing out progressively, but it appears that there are regions where the core is actually melting. The net flow of heat from core to mantle ensures that there's still overall freezing of outer core material and it's still growing over time, but by no means is this a uniform process.

"Our model allows us to explain some seismic measurements which have shown that there is a dense layer of liquid surrounding the inner core. The localised melting theory could also explain other seismic observations, for example why seismic waves from earthquakes travel faster through some parts of the core than others."


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Re: Geology Rocks! Unusual earthquake gave Japan tsunami extra punch

rob Sun, May 29, 2011 - 1:30 AM by offlinerob

Stanford CA (SPX) May 27, 2011
The magnitude 9 earthquake and resulting tsunami that struck Japan on March 11 were like a one-two punch - first violently shaking, then swamping the islands - causing tens of thousands of deaths and hundreds of billions of dollars in damage. Now Stanford researchers have discovered the catastrophe was caused by a sequence of unusual geologic events never before seen so clearly.
"It was not appreciated before this earthquake that this size of earthquake was possible on this plate boundary," said Stanford geophysicist Greg Beroza. "It was thought that typical earthquakes were much smaller."

The earthquake occurred in a subduction zone, where one great tectonic plate is being forced down under another tectonic plate and into the Earth's interior along an active fault.

The fault on which the Tohoku-Oki earthquake took place slopes down from the ocean floor toward the west. It first ruptured mainly westward from its epicenter - 32 kilometers (about 20 miles) below the seafloor - toward Japan, shaking the island of Honshu violently for 40 seconds.

Surprisingly, the fault then ruptured eastward from the epicenter, up toward the ocean floor along the sloping fault plane for about 30 or 35 seconds.

As the rupture neared the seafloor, the movement of the fault grew rapidly, violently deforming the seafloor sediments sitting on top of the fault plane, punching the overlying water upward and triggering the tsunami.

"When the rupture approached the seafloor, it exploded into tremendously large slip," said Beroza. "It displaced the seafloor dramatically.

"This amplification of slip near the surface was predicted in computer simulations of earthquake rupture, but this is the first time we have clearly seen it occur in a real earthquake.

"The depth of the water column there is also greater than elsewhere," Beroza said. "That, together with the slip being greatest where the fault meets the ocean floor, led to the tsunami being outlandishly big."

Beroza is one of the authors of a paper detailing the research, published online last week in Science Express.

"Now that this slip amplification has been observed in the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, what we need to figure out is whether similar earthquakes - and large tsunamis - could happen in other subduction zones around the world," he said.

Beroza said the sort of "two-faced" rupture seen in the Tohoku-Oki earthquake has not been seen in other subduction zones, but that could be a function of the limited amount of data available for analyzing other earthquakes.

There is a denser network of seismometers in Japan than any other place in the world, he said. The sensors provided researchers with much more detailed data than is normally available after an earthquake, enabling them to discern the different phases of the March 11 temblor with much greater resolution than usual.

Prior to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, Beroza and Shuo Ma, who is now an assistant professor at San Diego State University, had been working on computer simulations of what might happen during an earthquake in just such a setting. Their simulations had generated similar "overshoot" of sediments overlying the upper part of the fault plane.

Following the Japanese earthquake, aftershocks as large as magnitude 6.5 slipped in the opposite direction to the main shock. This is a symptom of what is called "extreme dynamic overshoot" of the upper fault plane, Beroza said, with the overextended sediments on top of the fault plane slipping during the aftershocks back in the direction they came from.

"We didn't really expect this to happen because we believe there is friction acting on the fault" that would prevent any rebound, he said. "Our interpretation is that it slipped so much that it sort of overdid it. And in adjusting during the aftershock sequence, it went back a bit.

"We don't see these bizarre aftershocks on parts of the fault where the slip is less," he said.

The damage from the March 11 earthquake was so extensive in part simply because the earthquake was so large. But the way it ruptured on the fault plane, in two stages, made the devastation greater than it might have been otherwise, Beroza said.

The deeper part of the fault plane, which sloped downward to the west, was bounded by dense, hard rock on each side. The rock transmitted the seismic waves very efficiently, maximizing the amount of shaking felt on the island of Honshu.

The shallower part of the fault surface, which slopes upward to the east and surfaces at the Japan Trench - where the overlying plate is warped downward by the motion of the descending plate - had massive slip. Unfortunately, this slip was ideally situated to efficiently generate the gigantic tsunami, with devastating consequences.

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Re: Geology Rocks!

rob Thu, July 21, 2011 - 3:36 AM by offlinerob

Nuclear fission powers the movement of Earth's continents and crust, a consortium of physicists and other scientists is now reporting, confirming long-standing thinking on this topic. Using neutrino detectors in Japan and Italy—the Kamioka Liquid-Scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and the Borexino Detector—the scientists arrived at their conclusion by measuring the flow of the antithesis of these neutral particles as they emanate from our planet. Their results are detailed July 17 in Nature Geoscience. (Scientific American is part of the Nature Publishing Group.)

Neutrinos and antineutrinos, which travel through mass and space freely due to their lack of charge and other properties, are released by radioactive materials as they decay. And Earth is chock full of such radioactive elements—primarily uranium, thorium and potassium. Over the billions of years of Earth's existence, the radioactive isotopes have been splitting, releasing energy as well as these antineutrinos—just like in a man-made nuclear reactor. That energy heats the surrounding rock and keeps the elemental forces of plate tectonics in motion. By measuring the antineutrino emissions, scientists can determine how much of Earth's heat results from this radioactive decay.

How much heat? Roughly 20 terawatts of heat—or nearly twice as much energy as used by all of humanity at present—judging by the number of such antineutrino particles emanating from the planet, dubbed geoneutrinos by the scientists. Combined with the 4 terawatts from decaying potassium, it's enough energy to move mountains, or at least cause the collisions that create them.

The precision of the new measurements made by the KamLAND team was made possible by an extended shutdown of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear reactor in Japan, following an earthquake there back in 2007. Particles released by the nearby plant would otherwise mix with naturally released geoneutrinos and confuse measurements; the closure of the plant allowed the two to be distinguished. The detector hides from cosmic rays—broadly similar to the neutrinos and antineutrinos it is designed to register—under Mount Ikenoyama nearby. The detector itself is a 13-meter-diameter balloon of transparent film filled with a mix of special liquid hydrocarbons, itself suspended in a bath of mineral oil contained in a 18-meter-diameter stainless steel sphere, covered on the inside with detector tubes. All that to capture the telltale mark of some 90 geoneutrinos over the course of seven years of measurements.

The new measurements suggest radioactive decay provides more than half of Earth's total heat, estimated at roughly 44 terawatts based on temperatures found at the bottom of deep boreholes into the planet's crust. The rest is leftover from Earth's formation or other causes yet unknown, according to the scientists involved. Some of that heat may have been trapped in Earth's molten iron core since the planet's formation, while the nuclear decay happens primarily in the crust and mantle. But with fission still pumping out so much heat, Earth is unlikely to cool—and thereby halt the collisions of continents—for hundreds of millions of years thanks to the long half-lives of some of these elements. And that means there's a lot of geothermal energy—or natural nuclear energy—to be harvested.

www.scientificamerican.com


Re: Geology Rocks! Fool's Gold Gives Scientists Priceless Insight Into Earth's Evolution

rob Mon, July 25, 2011 - 1:05 AM by offlinerob

ScienceDaily (July 23, 2011) — Fool's gold is providing scientists with valuable insights into a turning point in Earth's evolution, which took place billions of years ago.


Scientists are recreating ancient forms of the mineral pyrite -- dubbed fool's gold for its metallic lustre -- that reveal details of past geological events.

Detailed analysis of the mineral is giving fresh insight into Earth before the Great Oxygenation Event, which took place 2.4 billion years ago. This was a time when oxygen released by early forms of bacteria gave rise to new forms of plant and animal life, transforming Earth's oceans and atmosphere.

Studying the composition of pyrite enables a geological snapshot of events at the time when it was formed. Studying the composition of different forms of iron in fool's gold gives scientists clues as to how conditions such as atmospheric oxygen influenced the processes forming the compound.

The latest research shows that bacteria -- which would have been an abundant life form at the time -- did not influence the early composition of pyrite. This result, which contrasts with previous thinking, gives scientists a much clearer picture of the process.

More extensively, their discovery enables better understanding of geological conditions at the time, which informs how the oceans and atmosphere evolved.

The research, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and the Edinburgh Collaborative of Subsurface Science and Engineering, was published in Science.

Dr Ian Butler, who led the research, said: "Technology allows us to trace scientific processes that we can't see from examining the mineral composition alone, to understand how compounds were formed. This new information about pyrite gives us a much sharper tool with which to analyse the early evolution of the Earth, telling us more about how our planet was formed."

Dr Romain Guilbaud, investigator on the study, said: "Our discovery enables a better understanding of how information on the Earth's evolution, recorded in ancient minerals, can be interpreted
www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! Reservoirs of Ancient Lava Shaped Earth

rob Wed, August 3, 2011 - 5:04 AM by offlinerob

Geological history has periodically featured giant lava eruptions that coat large swaths of land or ocean floor with basaltic lava, which hardens into rock formations called flood basalt. New research from Matthew Jackson and Richard Carlson proposes that the remnants of six of the largest volcanic events of the past 250 million years contain traces of the ancient Earth's primitive mantle -- which existed before the largely differentiated mantle of today -- offering clues to the geochemical history of the planet.


Scientists recently discovered that an area in northern Canada and Greenland composed of flood basalt contains traces of ancient Earth's primitive mantle. Carlson and Jackson's research expanded these findings, in order to determine if other large volcanic rock deposits also derive from primitive sources.

Information about the primitive mantle reservoir -- which came into existence after Earth's core formed but before Earth's outer rocky shell differentiated into crust and depleted mantle -- would teach scientists about the geochemistry of early Earth and how our planet arrived at its present state.

Until recently, scientists believed that Earth's primitive mantle, such as the remnants found in northern Canada and Greenland, originated from a type of meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites. But comparisons of isotopes of the element neodymium between samples from Earth and samples from chondrites didn't produce the expected results, which suggested that modern mantle reservoirs may have evolved from something different.

Carlson, of Carnegie's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, and Jackson, a former Carnegie fellow now at Boston University, examined the isotopic characteristics of flood basalts to determine whether they were created by a primitive mantle source, even if it wasn't a chondritic one.

They used geochemical techniques based on isotopes of neodymium and lead to compare basalts from the previously discovered 62-million-year-old primitive mantle source in northern Canada's Baffin Island and West Greenland to basalts from the South Pacific's Ontong-Java Plateau, which formed in the largest volcanic event in geologic history. They discovered minor differences in the isotopic compositions of the two basaltic provinces, but not beyond what could be expected in a primitive reservoir.

They compared these findings to basalts from four other large accumulations of lava-formed rocks in Botswana, Russia, India, and the Indian Ocean, and determined that lavas that have interacted with continental crust the least (and are thus less contaminated) have neodymium and lead isotopic compositions similar to an early-formed primitive mantle composition.

The presence of these early-earth signatures in the six flood basalts suggests that a significant fraction of the world's largest volcanic events originate from a modern mantle source that is similar to the primitive reservoir discovered in Baffin Island and West Greenland. This primitive mantle is hotter, due to a higher concentration of radioactive elements, and more easily melted than other mantle reservoirs. As a result, it could be more likely to generate the eruptions that form flood basalts.

Start-up funding for this work was provided by Boston University.

www.sciencedaily.com


Re: Geology Rocks! Researchers pinpoint date and rate of Earth's most extreme extinction

rob Wed, November 23, 2011 - 1:12 AM by offlinerob

It's well known that Earth's most severe mass extinction occurred about 250 million years ago. What's not well known is the specific time when the extinctions occurred. A team of researchers from North America and China have published a paper in Science this week which explicitly provides the date and rate of extinction.

"This is the first paper to provide rates of such massive extinction," says Dr. Charles Henderson, professor in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary and co-author of the paper: Calibrating the end-Permian mass extinction.

"Our information narrows down the possibilities of what triggered the massive extinction and any potential kill mechanism must coincide with this time."

About 95 percent of marine life and 70 percent of terrestrial life became extinct during what is known as the end-Permian, a time when continents were all one land mass called Pangea. The environment ranged from desert to lush forest.

Four-limbed vertebrates were becoming diverse and among them were primitive amphibians, reptiles and a group that would, one day, include mammals.

Through the analysis of various types of dating techniques on well-preserved sedimentary sections from South China to Tibet, researchers determined that the mass extinction peaked about 252.28 million years ago and lasted less than 200,000 years, with most of the extinction lasting about 20,000 years.

"These dates are important as it will allow us to understand the physical and biological changes that took place," says Henderson. "We do not discuss modern climate change, but obviously global warming is a biodiversity concern today.

The geologic record tells us that 'change' happens all the time, and from this great extinction life did recover."

There is ongoing debate over whether the death of both marine and terrestrial life coincided, as well as over kill mechanisms, which may include rapid global warming, hypercapnia (a condition where there is too much CO2 in the blood stream), continental aridity and massive wildfires.

The conclusion of this study says extinctions of most marine and terrestrial life took place at the same time. And the trigger, as suggested by these researchers and others, was the massive release of CO2 from volcanic flows known as the Siberian traps, now found in northern Russia.

Henderson's conodont research was integrated with other data to establish the study's findings. Conodonts are extinct, soft-bodied eel-like creatures with numerous tiny teeth that provide critical information on hydrocarbon deposits to global extinctions.


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